If you were to make something that will have to last decades, what would you do?

Using a micro controller, maybe solar cells etc. Something what would not require to be connected to a wall constantly.

I would use some super caps, some solar cells and when enough charge on the caps from the solar cells, dump all the power to something. Maybe a super bright LED. Also, I would totally use clear resin to pot it.

Maybe a data-logger? Random Morse code transmissions? xD

Max size of a kitchen blender or a toaster for reference.

What would you do?

Hi,

How about a simple weather forecaster. This could be based on a barometric pressure sensor and would display the 12~24 hour forecast with leds somehow (colours or a line or ring of leds)?

Paul

Pringles:
What would you do?

Are you asking for project suggestions ?

OR

Are you asking how to build your project so that it will be reliable enough to work for decades ?

…R

I built a microprocessor control system for a ham radio repeater back in 1976 and it lasted 25 years. After that it was still working but they took it down when they relocated the repeater and wanted more facilities on it.

Robin2: Are you asking for project suggestions ? Are you asking how to build your project so that it will be reliable enough to work for decades ?

Well, ideas would'nt be bad, and yes. Id like some knowledge of how to make projects that will be reliable enough to work for decades. Thanks!

Grumpy_Mike: I built a microprocessor control system for a ham radio repeater back in 1976 and it lasted 25 years. After that it was still working but they took it down when they relocated the repeater and wanted more facilities on it.

Cool, what were the conditions? Cold, hot? dust? was it potted or enclosed very well or exposed? I'd like to do something involving electronics and weather/time proof.

Lots of stuff, that isn’t made in China, lasts for decades.

It’s when you have to make things very cheaply that durability fails.

With all that said, a +1 to Grumpy Mike for making a microprocessor back in the seventies, that would have entailed lots of discrete ICs, not so easy… Wherever that repeater is it would have been out in the elements. Again, not so easy.

cyberjeff: Lots of stuff, that isn't made in China, lasts for decades.

It's when you have to make things very cheaply that durability fails.

With all that said, a +1 to Grumpy Mike for making a microprocessor back in the seventies, that would have entailed lots of discrete ICs, not so easy... Wherever that repeater is it would have been out in the elements. Again, not so easy.

But, I'm not trying to buy something, I'm trying to make it! Thanks!

Wherever that repeater is it would have been out in the elements.

Sorry to disappoint but the repeater was in a barn. True it was unheated. It was built is a die-cast box. Here is a picture of it, and one of a friend John ( G4BVE ) putting it in place close to the roof of the barn :-

It used the Signetics 2650 processor and the code was stored in UV erasable ROM. It had no RAM at all, it just used the internal registers in the chip for temporary storage. At the time 100 plus TTL chips were considered normal for repeater logic. I know this was the first repeater logic in the UK to be processor controlled but I am not sure if it was the first world wide.

I had to “invent” the notion of a watch dog, a real watchdog circuit was patented two years after this repeater controller. The three cylinders on the top of the transmitter are cavity filters to keep out the transmitted signal from the receiver.

73s from G8HBR

Grumpy_Mike: Here is a picture of it, and one of a friend John ( G4BVE ) putting it in place close to the roof of the barn :- I (just) remember when the world was black and white ;D

I had to "invent" the notion of a watch dog, a real watchdog circuit was patented two years after this repeater controller. A missed opportunity. :(

A missed opportunity.

Yes indeed it was.

I (just) remember when the world was black and white

I used to do all my own developing and printing of photographs then so most of my printing was B/W although I did develop and print colour stuff eight years earlier than this but it was so expensive. :)

Is that a 2N3055 in a power supply?

Takes me back to when I used to use lots of veroboard to make projects. I still use it.

Weedpharma

Is that a 2N3055 in a power supply?

To be honest I can’t remember, it is either that or an OC28, which being germanium is even older.

Grumpy_Mike: To be honest I can't remember, it is either that or an OC28, which being germanium is even older.

I'm unfamiliar with the OC28. Other side of the ocean, probably...

Delco used doorknob style germaniums in a rather inefficient heat generating design for quite a few years. My impression was that they could take a lot of abuse.

Drive around and look at the LED stoplights and you will find quite a few with segments out.

How about old school?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centennial_Light

That hairstyle brings back memories of when i had any.

Make Tube Class A amp will last few decades.

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http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=328134.msg2269853#msg2269853

sonnyyu: Make Tube Class A amp will last few decades.

Not in continuous service. :)

aarg: Not in continuous service. :)

OK, with replacement Tube. :)

sonnyyu: OK, with replacement Tube. :)

That's cheating, surely?

If its OK to replace parts, you can make a circuit on a breadboard last for decades by replacing any component that becomes faulty, including the breadboard itself and the connecting wires!