In a boolean variable, what does "running" mean exactly?

It's the name for the variable of course, but since it goes orange inside arduino, is there any special function that it has?

Hawks:
It's the name for the variable of course, but since it goes orange inside arduino, is there any special function that it has?

The boolean variable has whatever function you give it. The orange coloring means that some library you have installed, even if you aren't using it, has defined that running is a keyword.

PaulS:
The boolean variable has whatever function you give it. The orange coloring means that some library you have installed, even if you aren't using it, has defined that running is a keyword.

Ah, thanks, makes sense.

PaulS:
The boolean variable has whatever function you give it. The orange coloring means that some library you have installed, even if you aren't using it, has defined that running is a keyword.

Of all the things I'd like to see fixed in the IDE would be for there to be a way for that coloring to only happen for keywords in libraries that were actually included by the project. But I'm guessing that type of code analysis is not a trivial thing to add since right now the IDE isn't much more than a text editor with a few extra buttons to fire off compile and upload scripts. If it were to be added at some point then adding all the context specific coloring like function names and class names and stuff would be pretty trivial after that.

TBH: Code analysis like that and error checking while I type are the two main reasons I moved to writing my code in Eclipse. I only use the IDE these days for copying in someone's code from the board.

Oh yeah, and autocomplete. That's so handy when I can't remember which one of the three or four sensible names that an API could give a particular function. With eclipse it even shows all the options with their arguments so as long as the person who wrote the code gave the functions and parameters sensible names, you can tell how to work half of these APIs just by typing the name of your instance and the dot and looking at what pops up.

That's so handy when I can't remember which one of the three or four sensible names that an API could give a particular function.

Or nonsense names, when programmers can't spell. Just yesterday, I was using a class that has a method to set the thickness of a line. The method? SetThikness(). Of course, when I tried to use the method, I spelled it correctly, and the code wouldn't compile. Spent a while trying to figure out what the hell the problem was.

So, yeah, code completion can come in handy. But, it annoys the hell out of me, because it rarely works properly in Visual Studio 2012 for me. When it does work, sometimes the matching line is highlighted, and pressing space/tab/enter puts the selected line in the code, and sometimes it isn't, and space/tab/enter just uses whatever I had typed.

More damned trouble than its worth, in my opinion.