Inconsistency in the library description for the LiquidCrystal Library

The syntax for LiquidCrystal() is given as:
LiquidCrystal(rs, enable, d4, d5, d6, d7)
However, the example code shows:
LiquidCrystal lcd(12, 11, 10, 5, 4, 3, 2);
Is this a genuine nit to be picked or am I missing something?

There are a few different constructors available:

  LiquidCrystal(uint8_t rs, uint8_t enable, uint8_t d0, uint8_t d1, uint8_t d2, uint8_t d3, uint8_t d4, uint8_t d5, uint8_t d6, uint8_t d7);
  LiquidCrystal(uint8_t rs, uint8_t rw, uint8_t enable, uint8_t d0, uint8_t d1, uint8_t d2, uint8_t d3, uint8_t d4, uint8_t d5, uint8_t d6, uint8_t d7);
  LiquidCrystal(uint8_t rs, uint8_t rw, uint8_t enable, uint8_t d0, uint8_t d1, uint8_t d2, uint8_t d3);
  LiquidCrystal(uint8_t rs, uint8_t enable, uint8_t d0, uint8_t d1, uint8_t d2, uint8_t d3);

Depends whether you are using 4 or 8 bit connection and read/write mode.

The functions above are ordered like this:
8 bit write mode.
8 bit read/write mode.
4 bit read/write mode.
4 bit write mode.

However, the example code shows:. . .

To which example are you referring?

It shows up on this page http://arduino.cc/en/Reference/LiquidCrystalConstructor but you may have a different one in mind.

If you look carefully at the constructors shown on that page you should spot the fact that each one has a different number of arguments in the parentheses. The constructor in the example has seven arguments so it matches up with the second syntax, not the first.

This means that the LCD in the example is running in the 4-bit mode but the R/W pin is connected to the Arduino instead of being connected to GND.

Incidentally at present there is no reason to use this configuration since no version of the LiquidCrystal library to date has ever implemented the LCD ‘Read’ capability. The R/W line is driven low by the library and kept there all the time. All it does is tie up an extra I/O line.

EDIT: I see that the example on that page is set up for a 16x1 display. This is a really bad choice since the vast majority of 16x1 displays are in fact internally configured as 8x2. On most 16x1 displays that example will result in a display of "hello, w " instead of "hello, world! ".

Don