Industrial strength hardware for an Arduino prototype

I am trying to find some options for industrial strength hardware. I am working on a project with another fellow and we have built a gadget that we would like to turn into a product. The prototypes we built were done with Arduino components and I am in the hunt for answers as to where to look for better hardware to flesh the product out. I have stumbled upon Atmel.com and Microchip.com and noticed that this hardware can be coded with Assembler as well as C but is this the place to look? Can some of the folks who have gone down this path give me a few ideas?

Thanks!

Pay attention to SWC on inputs, temperature ranges, supplier recommendations for product usage, power supply considerations, ambient factors, EMI/RFI shielding, and liabilities.
Firmware o/p with Assembler and C are almost the same today.

Define "better hardware"? The usual strategy would be to design your own HW that still runs Arduino SW. But if you've just "stumbled" upon Atmel and Microchip, that's probably a bit beyond your abilities.

You might be interested in http://www.ruggedcircuits.com/ruggeduino/

"Better hardware" is completely separate from the assembler/C/Arduino question...

You should also start paying attention to licenses. While the Arduino core itself has stated their intent to allow proprietary products to be built with their SW, some of the 3rd party libraries have explicitly used some of the more viral versions of GPL licenses designed to make sure that any product that uses them must also be open source.

I'm thinking you are talking about certification. In my part of the world, UL and CSA are the common outfits that certify (and list) a product to be sold in the market, but I can still get Arduino boards and clones without certification. It mostly seems to matter if someone wants to put it in something that has to go through an inspection process, e.g. if I make beer at home no inception but If I hire (is it like ten or more?) to make beer then inspections can start (OSHA, city, county...), in which case they need to see listed (certified) equipment. Getting listed is not so difficult, but it is costly, I would make sure to have a desirable product first, but frankly I have no clue how to do that. UL and CSA will work with you to find the standards suitable for your product, but it never hurts to do a little research.

How do I research, find a certified product, the first thing I ran across was Controllino (by SG-Tronic):
http://controllino.cc/

then start Looking for its listing:
UL Database

Interesting how I did not find a listing but they may have it under a different name. Once you find a listed product it will tell you the standards used for compliance, next you can look for the standards documentation.

A beer crafter once told me, "You can't buy beer with food stamps, but you can buy the ingredients".

Nothing wrong with using a full Arduino board in your product. I assume you're thinking it doesn't seem very "professional", but if you were the guy repairing machines in a factory and stuck your head in to see that an Uno was fried and needed replacement would you really be disappointed that it was such a ubiquitous part?

Chagrin:
Nothing wrong with using a full Arduino board in your product. I assume you’re thinking it doesn’t seem very “professional”, but if you were the guy repairing machines in a factory and stuck your head in to see that an Uno was fried and needed replacement would you really be disappointed that it was such a ubiquitous part?

Thanks for the answer! I wouldn’t mind that at all but I figured that it would be best to find a different set of hardware due to the price of the Arduino boards. I also assumed that the avr and pic stuff was a little more heavy duty I guess just because the Arduino stuff is geared more toward the hobbyist.

I think you have the wrong idea about where industrial strength is from, it is not from the AVR or PIC chips but from understanding how someone may incorrectly connect to your product, and that range of considerations is vast. Ruggeduino (pointed out by westfw already) has a list of Protection details, that is the sort of stuff you want to consider for industrial strength (and depending on the application and related standards may also be the sort of info that UL or CSA needs for listing). The ATMega328P AVR chip found in Arduino Uno and other boards is a robust microcontroller I personally have found it handled all sorts of abuses. I have also used PIC microcontrollers in the past and they are robust, but once I started using GCC on Linux and found it was the same for AVR I will never go back to PIC (without good pay or someone high up at Microchip pulls their head out of the darkness, and changes the PIC16 & PIC18 to work with GCC, PIC32 is just MIPS and that could end up in the Arduino toolchain). The other day I looked at AVR and PIC quantities on Digikey and it is clear who is winning the war at the moment, and I certainly know why I moved.