Infrared encoder

Hello!

So my son just got a second hand Dark knight batpod, which is basically an IR remote controlled toy, but the remote control is missing.

I had an idea of trying to build myself a IR transmitter to control the batpod but of course not having the original control makes it a challenge and that is why I require the assistance of the community!

My idea is to "bruteforce" the protocol, by trying all possible bits in various frequencies to see if something happens and try to understand the basic controls for the toy.

I've made multiple projects with RF in the past, but IR was always kind of a black box for me, although I understand the basic principle of how it works.

My questions are: Is this feaseable? Is there anyway in which I can reduce the number of possibilities (i.e. find the frequency)?

Thank you in advance!

Pedro

Technically probably possible but without any information on the remote control system, I don't think you have much of a chance. The number of possibilities is staggering. Frequency, encoding, number of bits per command, transfer speed, and of course the actual command (in case of a 20-bit command size that's a HUGE number of options to try, and at even 100 bps it takes forever to try them all, even the more basic 12-bit commands offer 4096 different options to try).

You may get a clue on what protocol it uses by opening up the toy and look at the part numbers. This may give you a very good idea on at least the protocol and frequencies and so used. Still you have the problem of the large command set

Find the manufacturer, and see if you can buy the remote from them. Search online to see if someone has a broken toy with intact remote for sale. That will give you a much better chance of success.

wvmarle:
Technically probably possible but without any information on the remote control system, I don't think you have much of a chance. The number of possibilities is staggering. Frequency, encoding, number of bits per command, transfer speed, and of course the actual command (in case of a 20-bit command size that's a HUGE number of options to try, and at even 100 bps it takes forever to try them all, even the more basic 12-bit commands offer 4096 different options to try).

You may get a clue on what protocol it uses by opening up the toy and look at the part numbers. This may give you a very good idea on at least the protocol and frequencies and so used. Still you have the problem of the large command set

Find the manufacturer, and see if you can buy the remote from them. Search online to see if someone has a broken toy with intact remote for sale. That will give you a much better chance of success.

Thank you! I will definitly follow the advice of opening the device and check for the receiver part number. I can't find the manufacturer online, still crawling ebay to try to find a working remote.

I would imagine that the odds of "breaking the protocol" were very minimal... but still I had to ask in case anybody had already come up with something like this.