Installing female Cat5 jack in housing

I have found most Cat5 female jacks are square mounting. Are there any round ones? I find round holes much easier to put into steel or aluminium housing.

If not, is there an easy way to cut the appropriate hole in the housing for the jack?

Thanks!

If you only need to do a few, drill a 1/4" hole in the center of where you want the jack to be, then use an appropriately sized square or triangular file to remove material from the corners. Use a file card to clear chips out of the teeth periodically. Sounds like a lot of work, but it will go quicker than you think.

Dremel tool with cutoff blades might work, but aluminum tends to gum up abrasive blades, and I think the blade diameter will be too large to get through the housing material before over-shooting the rectangle size. Dremel tools also have a tendency to make things go wrong much quicker than non-power tools. You would probably still need a the square file to clean up the corners.

Feddar:
I have found most Cat5 female jacks are square mounting. Are there any round ones? I find round holes much easier to put into steel or aluminium housing.

If not, is there an easy way to cut the appropriate hole in the housing for the jack?

Thanks!

Will this round RJ45 connector work?

For the cost of the round ones, I think it would be better to learn to make square holes.

If you are making larger holes in thin materials, a nibbler tool is fantastic. I bought one a long time ago and it seemed expensive at the time but I've made hundreds of instrument panels and other projects with it. Square, round, whatever: it's all the same to the nibbler.

A square file works well for this sort of thing. You can find files that only have teeth on the flat too but not on the edge which allows you to file a hole without eating into the side of it as you do it. Especially in aluminum etc, it is not that big a deal to drill a hole about the size of the square then file it square. Brad point bits work very well for drilling thin aluminum stock - they don’t tend to grab and yank the work piece as they go through.

gpsmikey:
A square file works well for this sort of thing. You can find files that only have teeth on the flat too but not on the edge which allows you to file a hole without eating into the side of it as you do it. Especially in aluminum etc, it is not that big a deal to drill a hole about the size of the square then file it square. Brad point bits work very well for drilling thin aluminum stock - they don't tend to grab and yank the work piece as they go through.

Yes

Learn how to file.
It will help you immensely in your projects.
If you screw up you can always get a piece of flat plastic, make the hole you need in it, then glue/screw it to your enclosure.

Also, a good reamer is great to have.

LarryD:
Also, a good reamer is great to have.

I had a boss like that one time :o

Get yourself a 3D printer to create your own enclosures. You will find that holes of all shapes and sizes can be printed at no extra cost!

josh_d:
If you only need to do a few, drill a 1/4" hole in the center of where you want the jack to be, then use an appropriately sized square or triangular file to remove material from the corners. Use a file card to clear chips out of the teeth periodically.

Thanks for the advice. I'll get the file and see how it goes. Is there a particular grain of the file that I should try to get?

Redde:
Will this round RJ45 connector work?
Cable Gland - Waterproof RJ-45 / Ethernet connector [RJ-45] : ID 827 : $7.95 : Adafruit Industries, Unique & fun DIY electronics and kits

That would be great, but the only one I can find for sale in Canada is $35, each. The Adafruit one is $11 CAD plus $30 shipping!

MorganS:
If you are making larger holes in thin materials, a nibbler tool is fantastic.

I thought about it, but the cost is quite high ($200-300). Are there manual versions?

gpsmikey:
Brad point bits work very well for drilling thin aluminum stock - they don't tend to grab and yank the work piece as they go through.

I'll look for it.

LarryD:
If you screw up you can always get a piece of flat plastic, make the hole you need in it, then glue/screw it to your enclosure.

Also, a good reamer is great to have.

Great idea. Any particular type of reamer I should look for?

JohnLincoln:
Get yourself a 3D printer to create your own enclosures. You will find that holes of all shapes and sizes can be printed at no extra cost!

How much does the material cost to make the box, ignoring the cost of the 3D printer itself?

Thanks everyone. You've all been a great help!

Something like this:
http://www.princessauto.com/en/detail/t-handle-tapered-reamer/A-p2910254e

Wouldn't hurt to have some smaller ones also.

Files:
http://www.princessauto.com/en/search?Dy=1&Nty=1&Ntt=file

The best file I have is an auger bit file.
No teeth on one side.
If nothing else buy one of these ! ! !

Auger bit file Lee Valley:

http://www.leevalley.com/en/wood/page.aspx?p=70693&cat=1,320,43072,43089,70693

Thanks for the suggestion. I love Lee Valley, and welcome any opportunity to go there!

Feddar:
How much does the material cost to make the box, ignoring the cost of the 3D printer itself?

Cents. You might pay $50 for a kilo of material and your box could weigh 20 grams, depending on how big it is.

The real cost is the time taken to design the box in the 3D cad and then the 5 failed prints where you forgot one detail and had to re-print it. Each print attempt might take 2-3 hours on the printer.

You could mount the RJ45 socket in a clipsal architrave plate (small switch plate)

Use a hole saw to clear the mounting of the socket in your panel.