Intelligent Outlet

Can one ardunio board controll all these thing—> temperature sensors,relay,zigbee,LEDs,power measurement and LCD

I attached image and give sugesstion how to do pls guys…

cats.jpg

Yes

I concur.


Rob

But, be careful if more than one is a shield.... in theory you can stack them in a kind of "Shield Dagwood", but sometimes the parts are taller than the headers and it's physically impossible. (Unless the upper shield has reaaaaaaaly long pins.....)

Also, look into pin usage and make sure if there are any conflicts you can either re-assign in software or cheat the wiring.

any shift register or multiplexers i want to use for this ??? and tell me how many outlets can be interface ??

how many outlets can be interface

You'll have to do that arithmetic yourself. You need details of the actual devices you want to use- input and output - make and model- since that's the only way to find out what types and number of pins each will need.

Different models of LCD, for example, use a totally different interfacing scheme and therefore a different number of pins.

Then when you have an idea of the number of pins you need, have a look at the Arduino specs and see which model can accommodate you.

a single Arduino 328P based board with 20 IO can do all that ??

shyamvenkat:
a single Arduino 328P based board with 20 IO can do all that ??

I repeat:

You'll have to do that arithmetic yourself. You need details of the actual devices you want to use- input and output - make and model- since that's the only way to find out what types and number of pins each will need.

In india the household wiring is not that much efficient more loose contacts so inside wiring are burning i have saw so many case who died in water heater… so in india is poor household wiring thats why i am planing to design such a work even in my home it happened inside the sockets the wire are burnt but it didnt trip off the circuit… between its just my idea to design home automation so i am just trying to do efficient household wiring so y repeatedly asking abt this and thanks for helping me out <3

want to convert block diagram into circuit diagram…

Correct coding ? ?

#include <GraphSeries.h> // Including the header file
GraphSeries g_aGraphs[] = {"power(Watts)"}; // Plotting graph for power in Watts
float Voltage = A0; //Defining and initializing the voltage
float Current = A2; // Defining and initializing the current
float I = 0;
float V = 0;
float P = 0;
float P1 = 0;
void setup()
{
Serial.begin(9600);
pinMode(Voltage,INPUT); //Set voltage as input pin
pinMode(Current,INPUT); //Set current as input pin
pinMode(P1,OUTPUT); //Set power as output pin
}
void loop()
{
float realPower = 0;
for(int i=0;i<400;i++) // Using for loop to calculate average power
{
float P = 0;
V= ((analogRead(Voltage)-(2.3*204.6))/204.6)*(66.474*1.414);
//Voltage from A0 is negative offsetted to get AC waveform and is then multiplied with transformation ratio of PT to get actual voltage waveform
I= ((analogRead(Current)-(2.22*204.6))/(204.6*20))*(76.667*1.414);
//Current from A2 is negative offsetted to get AC voltage waveform, which is then converted to current by dividing voltage with appropriate resistance to get AC current waveform and is then multiplied with transformation ratio of CT to get actual current waveform
P=V*I; // Voltage and current waves are multiplied at some instants
realPower=realPower+abs(P); //Power is added after successive instants
delay(0.05);
}
P1=realPower/400.0; // Above obtained power is averaged by number of instants
Serial.println(P1); //Moving the value of average power to com window
g_aGraphs[0].SendData(P1); // Displayed average power using MegunoLink
}

Honestly I feel that you are not up to this project at present. We've gone from a rough block diagram of a fuzzy concept to an unintelligible sketch that calculates average power (or something). Apart from being bad code (it uses floats for pin numbers) this software is about the last thing you need to think about right now.

You need to really spec the system, not just put up a block diagram, for example what the heck is a "Control module", that could be anything from a PDP-11 to an Arduino Mini.

I project like this is a LOT of work.


Rob

JimboZA:
But, be careful if more than one is a shield… in theory you can stack them in a kind of “Shield Dagwood”, but sometimes the parts are taller than the headers and it’s physically impossible. (Unless the upper shield has reaaaaaaaly long pins…)

Also, look into pin usage and make sure if there are any conflicts you can either re-assign in software or cheat the wiring.

The other problem I see with many shields is that the pins that plug into the lower board have male connections on the shield top, and the female connectors are outboard of those, so the next shield needs to have those headers reversed, or better still, replace the male-male headers with male-female, with the male part having long pins.

And not only pin usage, but also interrupt and timer conflicts.

And not only pin usage, but also interrupt and timer conflicts.

Yes, despite the hype Arduino is not really designed to use multiple shields, there was no obvious thought put into the design past the first shield. Sure it often works but it often doesn't as well.


Rob

sorry for the trouble here the design

Sorry but that's not a design, it's a back-of-napkin sketch at best.

For example we have what looks like mains wires going into a box called "Arduino/relay shield".

Nobody can work from that.


Rob