IOT project

How to make heart attack detecting wrist watch?which hardware and software will be required ?

Did you attempt to google this at all? Doing a google search provides a plethora of information to do just what you are asking. Here is one example.

I hope you intend to do this as a project for fun, not for use as actual emergency device.

wvmarle:
I hope you intend to do this as a project for fun, not for use as actual emergency device.

+1.

Fun!? :astonished: :astonished: :astonished:


Ignoring for a moment, the utter absurdity of this suggestion appearing in an engineering forum, :grinning: the plain fact is that survival from a cardiac arrest is completely dependent on the presence of a person able to provide CPR. The obvious exception to this is where the victim already has an ICD (which fortunately, I personally have avoided :sunglasses: ).

A watch clearly fills neither of these niches, explaining why no such device is presently available, and clearly is not expected to be.

In short, the concept is “dead in the water”. :roll_eyes:

Paul__B:
+1.

Fun!? :astonished: :astonished: :astonished:


Ignoring for a moment, the utter absurdity of this suggestion appearing in an engineering forum, :grinning: the plain fact is that survival from a cardiac arrest is completely dependent on the presence of a person able to provide CPR. The obvious exception to this is where the victim already has an ICD (which fortunately, I personally have avoided :sunglasses: ).

A watch clearly fills neither of these niches, explaining why no such device is presently available, and clearly is not expected to be.

In short, the concept is "dead in the water". :roll_eyes:

While the apple watch does not call it a heart attach monitor, they do have a ECG. SO, i would not say the concept is dead in the water.

Romonaga:
While the apple watch does not call it a heart attack monitor, they do have a ECG. So, I would not say the concept is dead in the water.

So what will the watch do if it detects ... what will it detect?

Note this explanation regarding the ECG on the Apple watch which requires you to be sitting quietly and hold a finger steadily on the watch button ("crown").

It has a number of limitations, but one is that it only sees ECG "Lead I", and only some (lateral?) infarcts show up clearly in this lead. Some more might show up if you touch your foot on the button instead to take the ECG (ECG "Lead III"), but the most useful position for detecting infarcts is V1/ V2 - centre of the chest.

So yes, a cute concept whose primary - and quite valuable - function is to screen for undiagnosed AF which we are supposed to look out for as a major cause of stroke. Just not for "heart attacks". :grinning:

Paul__B:
+1.

Fun!? :astonished: :astonished: :astonished:

LOL yes... for lack of a better word :slight_smile:

Paul__B:
So what will the watch do if it detects ... what will it detect?

Note this explanation regarding the ECG on the Apple watch which requires you to be sitting quietly and hold a finger steadily on the watch button ("crown").

It has a number of limitations, but one is that it only sees ECG "Lead I", and only some (lateral?) infarcts show up clearly in this lead. Some more might show up if you touch your foot on the button instead to take the ECG (ECG "Lead III"), but the most useful position for detecting infarcts is V1/ V2 - centre of the chest.

So yes, a cute concept whose primary - and quite valuable - function is to screen for undiagnosed AF which we are supposed to look out for as a major cause of stroke. Just not for "heart attacks". :grinning:

:slight_smile: Yes, I am very much aware of the limitations nor would I bet my life on the deice, and yes, you do need to activate the feature as it does not scan realtime. Health care is moving towards this, and eventually it will be more than just a cute concept.

Paul__B:
the plain fact is that survival from a cardiac arrest is completely dependent on the presence of a person able to provide CPR. The obvious exception to this is where the victim already has an ICD (which fortunately, I personally have avoided :sunglasses: ).

A friend of mine worked on a wearable device (not implanted) that is going through human testing and FDA approvals right now.
It detects when the heart stops, then delivers a shock through attached probes just like an AED Defibrillator.
The device attaches to the body in multiple places and uses a rechargeable battery pack and is worn continuously.
It is intended for certain patients that have heart failure and are waiting for a transplant.

He was involved with testing on pigs and now the device is being tested on humans in Romania.
Cool device but also very scary especially for the human test subjects.
They basically give them a heart attack (stop their heart) and then make sure the device detects it and properly fires the shocking signals to re-start the heart.

---- bill

bperrybap:
A friend of mine worked on a wearable device (not implanted) that is going through human testing and FDA approvals right now.
It detects when the heart stops, then delivers a shock through attached probes just like an AED Defibrillator.
The device attaches to the body in multiple places and uses a rechargeable battery pack and is worn continuously.
It is intended for certain patients that have heart failure and are waiting for a transplant.

He was involved with testing on pigs and now the device is being tested on humans in Romania.
Cool device but also very scary especially for the human test subjects.
They basically give them a heart attack (stop their heart) and then make sure the device detects it and properly fires the shocking signals to re-start the heart.

---- bill

You could not pay me enough to take part in that study.

Romonaga:
You could not pay me enough to take part in that study.

Maybe payment expectations are lower in some parts of Romania.

The specific algorithm/methodology for the electrical shock signals used in every AED here in the USA and in the product he was working on is mandated by the FDA in order to get approval.
However, while at first that sounds great, the voltage over time & current being used was never truly scientifically determined. It goes back to one of the early popular devices (before FDA controlled approvals on this type of device) and then the FDA adopted it - because it "seemed to work".
According to my buddy there now alternative known ways to handle the electric shock that may be better in certain circumstances but the FDA only approves this older single methodology.

BTW, it is very difficult to do human testing for this type of device as there are very few countries in the world allow such testing.
As you might have guessed human testing is not allowed in the US. - but oddly enough, it is required to get FDA approval.

--- bill

I was going to bring up the question of how exactly you would determine if the device actually does detect a heart attack, since having someone wear the watch until they experienced a heart attach doesn't seem practical.

david_2018:
I was going to bring up the question of how exactly you would determine if the device actually does detect a heart attack, since having someone wear the watch until they experienced a heart attach doesn't seem practical.

I did try to summarise that in #5 as well as #3.

What bperrybap describes, and a watch basically have nothing whatsoever in common. As I said, "dead in the water". :astonished:

The OP is - sensibly - lying low. Successful troll, #12 so far. :grinning:


bperrybap:
They basically give them a heart attack (stop their heart) and then make sure the device detects it and properly fires the shocking signals to re-start the heart.

Essentially what I had done to determine I did not require the ICD.

Not strictly correct terminology however. A "heart attack" resulting in arrest (actually stopping the heart) is generally not recoverable by a defibrillator. A defibrillator (including ICD) corrects ventricular fibrillation, which is completely disordered electrical activity, so the defibrillator "resets" the activity to a regular one.

I think what we really need is more input from Rehan_18 as to what is meant by "heart attack" and what he had in mind to know if it is reasonably possible for something like an Arduino.

Based on our assumptions, the answer is no, but there are certain types of non-fatal or even non critical type of cardiac events such as various types of arrhythmias that could be detected that would be possible with arduino type h/w.

--- bill

In any event, it was a fun conversation.