ir extender

I'm new so don't be to harsh please. I have seen several Libraries on ir but nothing on extending the range of a remote. basically trying to use a remote around a corner. nothing fancy just replay whatever button i push to the dish box around the corner.

You can use the IR library to both receive and send IR, so you can connect a IR detector and an IR LED and mount your Arduino on the corner in question.

You would however need to know what protocol your remote uses so that you could setup the IR library to decode the signals

I wonder in this case however whether you even need the arduino do read the value of the data at all, or perhaps whether simply getting the arduino to read the IR detector and flash the IR LED may do the trick.

The only downside with this is that the IR receiver may be suseptable to IR noise, so your IR Led may be flashing away unnecessarily and perhaps interfere with other remotes you are using. But as the code to do this is probably 10 lines or less it may be worth a try to start with.

You'll want to browse through Vishay's IR receivers, but I'm not clear if you want a "learning" receiver or a "repeater". The latter would seem obvious, but those modules are only for 38KHz carrier frequencies. The "learning" type seems to just repeat whatever signal is thrown at it but doesn't care about the carrier frequency.

The simplest approach would be to use one of the ir LIBRARIES IRremote or IRLib.

As has been mentioned - if your IR protocols are supported by the library it will be pretty simple. If not you will have to use the sendRAW feature ,which should be able to handle most signals out there.

You may have to guess the modulation frequency to use.

Another way to get around a corner is a mirror. Sometimes just driving the IR LED with more current will also work (depending on the situation/layout).

AnalysIR: The simplest approach would be to use one of the ir LIBRARIES IRremote or IRLib.

But he's just trying to bounce the signal around the corner -- he doesn't even need to decode it. Vishay's "repeater" datasheet shows the circuit that would be used to perform that action, but again that's a 38KHz-only part.

Have you ever tried to do this type of thing? Am I right that the "learning" type of receiver is the only viable choice when the carrier frequency is not known?

Have you ever tried to do this type of thing? Am I right that the "learning" type of receiver is the only viable choice when the carrier frequency is not known?

Yes, if I was doing it I would take the approach you suggested (In fact I designed such a circuit recently, which works well).

However, the OP is a beginner, so I thought using the Arduino would be simpler for beginners.

If the OP is capable of doing up a PCB & adding some support components & power supply etc, then the approach you suggested is the way to go. Of course it would be much simpler to prototype on a (solderless) breadboard.

FYI: we plan to launch this PCB/module (RepeatIR) in a month or 2. Preview available below. http://www.analysir.com/blog/2014/10/22/preview-repeatir-advanced-infrared-repeater/

You will get an idea of the Rx range, Tx Range & modulation frequencies achievable from the Data Sheet.

Of course there's nothing wrong with building such a project as an excuse for playing with the electronics and learning programming. If that's your goal, go for it!

But from a strictly time and money viewpoint, do realize that there are plenty of low-cost solutions already available: they range from very expensive and sophisticated systems, all the way down to simple extenders with a receiver on the end of a long cable and an emitter or two. Some of these simple systems are half the cost of an Uno, and don't require any support components or time to develop the circuits and code.

Fast and simple, but not nearly as much fun!

thanks for the help I am still not sure what i am doing the electronic part of the project is the easy part i have experience with that the main reason for the project is that i am trying to learn programing thought that this might be a good place to go i have done all that projects that came in the book. i thought that learning to combine libraries and write my own code could be a good next step. i could build or buy a remote extender probable for less that $20 but expanding my knowledge base is the main goal. how would i get it to repeat the code with the proper delay.

Have you tried anything yet? e.g. all of the examples provided with the IRremote or IRLib libraries?

deancoe:
i could build or buy a remote extender probable for less that $20 but expanding my knowledge base is the main goal. how would i get it to repeat the code with the proper delay.

Yes, buying a product is easy and cheap, but doing it yourself as a learning experience is much more fun. Bravo!

How to do it? As AnalysIR mentions, start with the examples.

First play with the IR receiver: get it working so that it receives IR signals, decodes them, and prints them out on the serial port. Look through the code, understand what it’s doing. Look at the library source code: the details might be arcane, but try to understand what it’s doing, and why. It’s OK if you don’t get all of the details at this point, but at least try to understand the general ideas.

Next, play with the IR transmitter. Get it working so that you can type a code on the serial port, and have it send out the proper signal. Again, look at the code and library, and understand what it’s doing and why.

When you get both halves working, now comes the interesting part: combining them together. The first step is to get both the sender and receiver libraries in the same sketch. There may be some conflicts between them, and knowing the gist of how they work will help you sort out any issues. When you get that to compile, then you need to add the code to wait for a code to be received, and pass it on to the transmitter.

Once you get the simple repeater function working, extra credit would be adding some automation: look for a specific unused code, and have it trigger a sequence of commands to be sent out. For example, my satellite receiver requires something like 23 button presses to turn closed caption on or off: something like that is a great candidate for automation.

I think I'd just go ebay.

http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_from=R40&_sacat=0&_nkw=ir+extender&rt=nc&LH_BIN=1