IR receiver

Hi, I'm new to this forum and hope I can find in it a good community.

I'm starting learning Arduino, but I have a little electronics knowledge and want to know more.
I have made some little «projects» with Arduino, such as light a LED, blink it, used a pushbutton to light on/off; tested LCD successfully, temperature sensor, LDR sensor, and some other basics.

What I want to do is use a Infra-red receiver on Arduino and use a TV remote to send signals to Arduino to decode HEX signal and furthermore make a LED light on/off.

But, I searched the web including arduino.cc website how to connect a IR receiver on a breadboard. I also used the IRremote library from shirriff (followed the instructions to edit the file in order to Arduino's IDE to recognize the library).

When I updated the code to arduino in order to test my IR receiver, it simply started to overheating and also I saw a little smoke from it (I suppose it is garbage now, but I have more to test).
I don't know what type of IR I have but tried to plug the GND, VCC and signal pins in different ways but the result was the same (overheating).

Another thing, if even a simple LED needs (good practice) a resistor why I can't see any resistor to use on IR receiver? I think I must use something to lower the current that my IR receives.

I'm sorry for the long post, as I'm new to this forum and electronics. Hope someone can point me to good way

Thanks

you need something like this
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2-x-IR-Receiver-Module-38-kHz-TSOP4838-FREE-SHIPPING-/260944290485?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item3cc17de2b5
Feed 5V, GND and outpin to digital in. The library you are using is OK (any remote-comtrol will do)

If you have seen smoke ? its RIP

From the IR link you posted, I have some like it to use (or throw to garbage :0). Following the picture, IR in front of me with the little circle facing me I found:

(From left to right)
Left pin - signal
Middle pin - GND
Right pin - VCC

I still can't use the IR and they all overheat. From what I've read, I can't simple test it with a multimeter to find out which pin is.
I also found a resource telling there is different order of the pins (different manufacturers). I want to ble able to test the order of the pins without burning my IR receivers

It might be useful to get the part number then googling it to find the datasheet assuming your supplier doesn't one on their web site. Then you can find out the connections/current etc. to make sure your aren't iving it too much welly!

That's the problem: my IR doesn't have any part number on it, if so I would check a datasheet how to connect it.

The numbers that my IR has are (at the back of the square):
upper numbers: 383B
bottom numbers: 54A

Goggled it and found nothing about this.

Anyway, I will buy a IR receiver and then check it's datasheet and will try to test it. All I wanted is to use the «old IR i have»

Post a photo of the gizmo you are trying to use?

I have used Ken Shirriff's writings with satisfying results.

takmud:
Hi, I'm new to this forum and hope I can find in it a good community.
.......
When I updated the code to arduino in order to test my IR receiver, it simply started to overheating and also I saw a little smoke from it (I suppose it is garbage now, but I have more to test).
I don't know what type of IR I have but tried to plug the GND, VCC and signal pins in different ways but the result was the same (overheating).

Another thing, if even a simple LED needs (good practice) a resistor why I can't see any resistor to use on IR receiver? I think I must use something to lower the current that my IR receives.
.......

You let the magic smoke out of it, it is most likely dead.
Buy a handful, they cost very little.
And when you buy them, you will know what datasheet to look at.

It actually contains a microchip, that will handle the incoming voltage, look for 38kHz modulated signal and write the signal out pin low when it receives something.
All you have to do is to feed it a voltage in the right range, and do digitalRead on the signal leg.

And a third post on the subject.

Lady Ada has a nice tutorial, including how to test your receiver

It is a really good idea to know what legs do what and make sure the receiver is working, before getting frustrated.

Most are "signal-GND-VCC" but I've some datasheets that were not in that order.

...... And googling for
Ir receiver 383
Gives this datasheet as the first hit
http://www.vishay.com/docs/81743/temt6202.pdf
VISHAY TSOP383
Does it look like it?

They actually have different orders of legs listed in that very sheet.

In the application circuit, a resistor and a capacitor is recommended (I've never used them..... I probably should, but it has not given me problems so far.)

no, my IR receiver doesn't seems like that.
A picture showing the IR receivers I have: https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQco_KroDa6nbE1Q6Lvl_KgJA127IlTOdZyQwToJH6z_mXhqwTt

Well, better to buy another one and ask for it's partnumber, so I can check the datasheet instead of burning the ones I have.

I have some with me, I didn't want to throw them to garbage, as I have around 10 at home (I'm pretty sure its all about the order of the pins, I just can't figure out what is the correct way to connect the pins)

Later I will try to use them again.

Thanks all

It may be worth looking at Vishay’s web site to see if you can match your what you are going to use this for against what they have available, try http://www.vishay.com/optical-sensors/ or http://www.vishay.com/optical-sensors/reflective-outputisnot-16/ , before you decide what to buy.

I found a sourcer where the tutorial indicated to place a 220 ohm resistor between the IR outup pin and the Arduino digital pin.

I always assumed that I should use like a resistor somewhere in the breadboard, a 220 ohm resistor took care of the overheating and I finally get results in Serial Monitor when I press a button on the remote.

Still, when I press a button I get around 3/4 lines on Serial Monitor, like this:

AF5B04F
FFFFFFFF
0
0

Some problem with any delays that may occur? or because it is a really really cheap remote control?

Anyway, thanks for all the help. I have my IR receiver working.

Tried the debounce example from the Arduino IDE?

some remotes send the code 3 times when you press a button. Some keep shooting the code and others just send it once.

FFFFFFF
Could be the remote's way of saying: "He still has his fat finger on the button, just ignore it".

Try some other remotes, and see what they do.

The -1 (FFFFFFF) is the 'repeat last code' sign. Button held down.
Other remotes can exact send same code again if buttom is held.
(this last type uses a toggle-bit to distinguish pressed repeatedly vs held down)

Thanks everyone that replied to my topic.

IR receiver is working (maybe not the perfect way, but it works).
I tried to light on/off an LED and I did it, but I has some delay between remote control button 1 (LIGHT on) and button 2 (LIGHT OFF). I use a delay(2000) because I read that most IR receivers have a delay of 2secs., but If even I wait these 2secs it still has delay (I did not coded the LED on/off state check and a statement to check if it is already ON or OFF when I press a remote button, I should have tried that before ask).
The odd thing is that remote control I bought really cheap works, but my TV remote doesn't work.

Working remote - it is a Janesong, universal TV remote ( It was bought at a Chinese shop [but I think it is from Japan] )
ir also doesn't work on any TV I have at home

Not working remote - from my TV Nordmende

Thanks again

Well, anyway thanks all for the help. I must now keep studying & try :slight_smile:

Hello all,

I found this Post with the subject " IR receiver " so i will give a try, maybe some one will help me, no one reply to my post's.
So lately i found out that i have a IR reciver with wavelength 700nm to 1000nm, but with that wavelength i found out with the simple
example code from the arduino software, " Analog Read Serial " that my IR reciver is sensitive to "visible light" i mean to normal room light or sun light, so my question is if i buy a 940nm IR reciver, that reciver will be sensitive to "visible light" or just from other led with the same wavelength "940nm" ???

What i actualy need is a IR reciver (i think 940nm) that will recive only IR light by reflecting from other objects (other story), but not "room light" & "sun light"

Thanks.

see this datasheet (TSOP 4838) http://www.vishay.com/docs/82459/tsop48.pdf
You will find that it will detect freq. 950nm (+/- 5-10%)
I have yet to meet a remote control that will go undetected
((Iæhav tested at least 10 differest remote-controls)

Thanks for Reply knut_ny

But im not talking about 3 pinds IR recivers, simple IR recivers with 940nm

ex. this one https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRd8JtoiPfsxt3ZuLJJ9FyiVuAyTl3lMZwKVh_yl3Lc1CT5zFwxpQ

OK, a phototransitor, sensitive in IR-range..
(now you will be able to se the modulation frequency as a bonus, an discover that 38kHz means roughly 38..)
Sorry

Sorry but i cant understant what you wana say !?

Do you readed my reply ?