Is 5.68V from DC power adapter too high for +5V pin?

Hi,

Rookie question: I bought this 5V 2A power adapter to power a Geekcreit Arduino Nano v3 clone and a strip of twenty of these WS2812B LEDs.

I measured a voltage of 5.68 volts output from the power supply with no load. From what I've read online, the +5V pin on the Arduino can take up to 5.5V input. if I supply 5.68V, do I risk burning out the Arduino? Is there any way I can reduce the voltage going into the Arduino?

Alternatively I considered supplying 9V to Vin on the Arduino, then power the LEDs from the +5V pin, however I am concerned that all twenty LEDs at full power might draw more current that the Arduino could provide (20 x 60mA = 1200 mA?).

You can't power those LEDs off the Arduino. It can supply about 200 mA, your LEDs draw way too much.

As the power supply is rated 5V it should normally be OK to connect directly - are you sure your volt meter is that accurate?

I confirmed the voltage with a second meter.

First measurement taken with Mastech MS8268: 5.68V

Second measurement taken with Aneng AN8002: 5.685V.

Although neither are Fluke quality meters, I've had pretty consistent results from birth, e.g. measuring against the same source, whether mains power, other DC power supplies, batteries, etc.

The question still remains, is it safe to feed more than 5.5V into the Arduino +5V pin? Is there another way to use this power adapter for my project? Or should I get a better quality wall wart that puts out 5V?

A diode in series in the + lead, like 1N400x, would drop the voltage to near 5V, certainly within spec.

psteiner: The question still remains, is it safe to feed more than 5.5V into the Arduino +5V pin? Is there another way to use this power adapter for my project? Or should I get a better quality wall wart that puts out 5V?

try measuring with a load on the p.s. say a 10K resistor.

a 1A diode in series with a 2A supply is gonna make for a hot diode if you try to draw the full 2A.......

You are right about that. I was thinking in terms of just the Arduino power.

Maybe I am missing something but why are you not just putting the power into the Vin pin. You could use 12v if you wanted to let alone almost 6 volts.

@Jayman the LEDs are 5V. Seemed simplest to run Arduino and LEDs from 5V.

JayMan: Maybe I am missing something but why are you not just putting the power into the Vin pin. You could use 12v if you wanted to let alone almost 6 volts.

In needs a least 6.5V on Vin.

I guess I have always just used 12v and I didn’t know that. Thanks