Is digital or sinusoidal stepper driver better?

Are digital or sinusoidal stepper drivers better? The sinusoidal M542T vs the digital DM542T? For running a Nema 23 stepper motor utilizing the UNO.
Thanks

Post links to the datasheets for the drivers. Are they really different under the hood?

...R

schemer:
Are digital or sinusoidal stepper drivers better? The sinusoidal M542T vs the digital DM542T? For running a Nema 23 stepper motor utilizing the UNO.
Thanks

They do exactly the same thing. They are microstepping drivers. I think you read the marketing nonsense,
not the datasheet (!)

https://www.omc-stepperonline.com/stepper-motor-driver/nema-23-stepper-motor-drive-24-50vdc-15a-45a-256-microstep-m542t-m542t.html?search=M542T

Not much difference except the digital version is on sale. :grin: The differences are in the input voltage, max amps, and 200 vs 300 kHz on the pulse frequency. I was was just curious if the digital was better or not.

I'm sure @MarkT knows more about this stuff than I do.

For what it's worth my view is that you won't be able to tell the difference so buy the cheapest one - assuming the specs meet your requirement.

...R

Robin2:
I'm sure @MarkT knows more about this stuff than I do.

For what it's worth my view is that you won't be able to tell the difference so buy the cheapest one - assuming the specs meet your requirement.

...R

What pulse frequency is the max the arduino uno can use? That would be my main concern as the voltage input and amps output would work for me on either one.

schemer:
What pulse frequency is the max the arduino uno can use?

That is a strange question.

You have to decide how many steps per second you need. When you tell us that we will be able to say whether an Arduino can do it. I can't see see how it will impact on your choice of driver - but then I don't know how many steps per second you need.

...R

schemer:
What pulse frequency is the max the arduino uno can use?

Faster than any stepper that is ever likely to be built.

Of course there may be other reasons why your Arduino is "slow". Doing floating-point calculations between each step is going to take a little bit of knowledge and experimentation to get it right.

schemer:
https://www.omc-stepperonline.com/stepper-motor-driver/digital-stepper-driver-10-42a-20-50vdc-for-nema-17-23-24-stepper-motor-dm542t.html

https://www.omc-stepperonline.com/stepper-motor-driver/nema-23-stepper-motor-drive-24-50vdc-15a-45a-256-microstep-m542t-m542t.html?search=M542T

Not much difference except the digital version is on sale. :grin: The differences are in the input voltage, max amps, and 200 vs 300 kHz on the pulse frequency. I was was just curious if the digital was better or not.

They are both digital, they both generate sinusoidal microstepping profiles. They are exactly the same kind of thing.

MorganS:
Faster than any stepper that is ever likely to be built.

Of course there may be other reasons why your Arduino is "slow". Doing floating-point calculations between each step is going to take a little bit of knowledge and experimentation to get it right.

With microstepping the limit can even be the opto-couplers - with x256 microstepping and a fast motor
you could handle >1M steps/second in theory - in practice you have to compromise on microstepping
factor to allow sensible step rates for rapid movement. 256k steps/second is 2400rpm with x32 microstepping,
for instance.

Robin2:
That is a strange question.

You have to decide how many steps per second you need. When you tell us that we will be able to say whether an Arduino can do it. I can't see see how it will impact on your choice of driver - but then I don't know how many steps per second you need.

...R

I guess I am trying to sort out why my stepper motor buzzes and clicks at very low rpm and was thinking maybe changing the pulses per revolution on the driver to more might help. It is currently set at 1600. Then I thought maybe I have a defective driver (M542T) so I bought a DM542T just to verify once it gets here. Then I noticed the M542T has greater PPR settings for max at 51200 vs 25600 on the DM542T. So that had me wondering if the driver alone controlled the PPR or if I had to be aware of the arduino having a limit. I am in learning mode as this is my first arduino project and was purchased as a set of plans.

MorganS:
Faster than any stepper that is ever likely to be built.

Of course there may be other reasons why your Arduino is "slow". Doing floating-point calculations between each step is going to take a little bit of knowledge and experimentation to get it right.

That answers that. Thanks. Now I do not have to worry about it. :slight_smile:

MarkT:
They are both digital, they both generate sinusoidal microstepping profiles. They are exactly the same kind of thing.

I didn't realize that as one is proud to say "Digital" on the face plate and has a "D" as in DN542T where the other one does not say digital on the faceplate and has no "D" in its name. Figured sinusoidal was older technology and digital was newer. I'm a noob at steppers and drivers as this is my first one. :open_mouth:

MarkT:
With microstepping the limit can even be the opto-couplers - with x256 microstepping and a fast motor
you could handle >1M steps/second in theory - in practice you have to compromise on microstepping
factor to allow sensible step rates for rapid movement. 256k steps/second is 2400rpm with x32 microstepping,
for instance.

In my case I am dealing with a NEMA 23 motor and am running it from 0-30 RPM. So I am sure either driver will work. I am just worried about the buzz and clicking at very low rpm and am on a nooby wild goose chase at the present time as I have no experience but will learn as I go.:slight_smile:

Thanks all for your comments and help.

added: This is the stepper motor I am using:
https://www.automationtechnologiesinc.com/products-page/nema-23/nema23-570ozin-5a-14”-dual-shaft-stepper-motor-kl23h2100-35-4bm/

Edit:

DOH! Even though I haven't tested it yet, I think I may have found my problem, maybe. On my drawings the image had a stepper with a plug pictured with the leads and colors in a certain order. I checked my stepper for the coil pairs so I knew I was doing it correct originally except...I had the A+ and A- leads backwards on the driver. Would/could that cause my problem? I will report back and let you know if it is in fact ok now.

schemer:
I didn't realize that as one is proud to say "Digital" on the face plate and has a "D" as in DN542T where the other one does not say digital on the faceplate and has no "D" in its name. Figured sinusoidal was older technology and digital was newer. I'm a noob at steppers and drivers as this is my first one. :open_mouth:

No, you've been confused by marketing spin I suspect.

schemer:
DOH! Even though I haven't tested it yet, I think I may have found my problem, maybe. On my drawings the image had a stepper with a plug pictured with the leads and colors in a certain order. I checked my stepper for the coil pairs so I knew I was doing it correct originally except...I had the A+ and A- leads backwards on the driver. Would/could that cause my problem? I will report back and let you know if it is in fact ok now.

That would only affect the direction the motor turns. You can reverse A+/A-, or reverse B+/B-, or swap
the A's with the B's - all three of these actions reverse the sense of rotation, but work equally well. The
only thing you can do wrong is connect a winding to both A and B terminals - that's going to fail.

Ok, that didn't fix the noise. And for some reason, although it sounds like a bearing, I don't think it is. But who knows. I read somewhere not to take apart a stepper motor as you will mess with the magnetism but I don't know so for now I am not taking my new motor apart. Here is what I did though. I lowered the peak amps from 4.2 (as set per the author of the plan instruction for more power/torque) down to 3.7 peak amps on my 3.5 amp motor. The next lower setting is 3.2 amps peak. I think I am ok there and if not, 3.2 amps it is. I put a piece of tape on the motor after switching the A+ and A- wires to their correct lugs and turned it on. I went through the 0-30 rpms on the pot and it vibrates the most down at about 9 rpm and lower. If I run it at 30 rpm the click noise is once per revolution. If I run it at 15 rpms I get 5 clicks per revolution. What do think is making it click??
Thanks

That would only affect the direction the motor turns. You can reverse A+/A-, or reverse B+/B-, or swap
the A's with the B's - all three of these actions reverse the sense of rotation, but work equally well. The
only thing you can do wrong is connect a winding to both A and B terminals - that's going to fail.

I figured that may be the case as it is just a coil, but better to ask and know for sure. Thanks.

MarkT:
No, you've been confused by marketing spin I suspect.

Ok But it was on sale so I saved money. :grinning: But in any event I wanted a spare driver in case mine is defective at low speeds or for my next project. No harm done. :wink:

And last but not least, being my driver is set to 1600 PPR what would be a sensible next choice. There are many and the face plate to choose from. Does anything coincide with it being a 1.8 degree stepper or doesn't that matter? I read more pulses per revolution make it smoother but I seriously don't know if it is even going to make a difference on the clicking...??
Thanks

schemer:
Does anything coincide with it being a 1.8 degree stepper or doesn't that matter? I read more pulses per revolution make it smoother but I seriously don't know if it is even going to make a difference on the clicking...??

Most stepper motors work at 1.8 degrees per step or 200 full steps per revolution. A micro-stepping driver can make the motor move in smaller steps so, for example, if it does 8 micro-steps for every full step it will need 1600 pulses to move the motor through a full revolution.

The speed of the motor is determined by the interval between pulses.

Stepper motors are designed to work in steps so they will never be as smooth as a simple DC motor. That is the price you pay for the ability to make precise movements.

I would not set the current limit to a figure that is higher than the motor spec states.

...R

Robin2:
Most stepper motors work at 1.8 degrees per step or 200 full steps per revolution. A micro-stepping driver can make the motor move in smaller steps so, for example, if it does 8 micro-steps for every full step it will need 1600 pulses to move the motor through a full revolution.

The speed of the motor is determined by the interval between pulses.

Stepper motors are designed to work in steps so they will never be as smooth as a simple DC motor. That is the price you pay for the ability to make precise movements.

I would not set the current limit to a figure that is higher than the motor spec states.

...R

Good info. Thanks. So are you saying that the vibration at certain speeds (very slow) is probably normal? What about the clicking type sound I spoke of? I guess I will buy another stepper motor of a different brand to see if the noises are the same. Then I will know what is causing the noise or if it is in fact normal. What do you think?

I think (after more research) I can easily solve this issue by purchasing a geared stepper which will take care a super slow speed noises and give me the torque I need. That is what I am going to do. I think about a 15/1 will solve the problem quite nicely. Thanks for all the help everybody. I am sure I can easily rewrite the simple code to get the LCD readout to match the final rpm.