Is it possible to make an arduino with like 1000+ pins? Just wondering

Im just wondering if there is a micro controller with 1000+ GPIO pins and if that is possible, how many PWM pins are there, I've also looked at centipede shields, but im not sure how to use them.

Why do you need 1000 IO ? That is an awful lot of wiring. What is going to be connected and where will the power come from?

You should look up multiplexers. You could use multiple centipede shields but each one only gives 64 IO and I am not sure how many you could connect. Read up on I2C.

There is a pwm board with 16 pwm outputs. You can connect 64 (if I'm not mistaken) of them on one I2C bus

What is I2C? The 1000 GPIO is just if you want to do a HUGE project, such as hooking up like 200+ Servos

SkyCrafter:
What is I2C? The 1000 GPIO is just if you want to do a HUGE project, such as hooking up like 200+ Servos

https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/i2c

There's this this 60-pin port expander. You can connect up to 128 such devices to a single I2C bus (it has 6 address selection pins!) - so that's 7,680 pins.

Still not enough? Add an I2C multiplexer.

Thank you wvmarle! never knew!

It’s probably not a very practical thing to do, though, and update rates for the pins will be terrible!

Is it possible to make an arduino with like 1000+ pins?

The simple answer is yes. But scaling up electronics is not as simple as just adding more parts.

Just like scaling up making one loaf of bread in your kitchen to 1000 loaves is not just a matter of having more kitchens. Different methods, different skills.

SkyCrafter: What is I2C? The 1000 GPIO is just if you want to do a HUGE project, such as hooking up like 200+ Servos

There are 16-channel PCA9685 servo breakout boards that can be daisy-chained. Only two pins of the Arduino are used for many boards. Clones on ebay. Leo..

Using that many modules on a single I2C bus could get dicey, but it's theoretically possible. I do not think you could get the whole 64 of them onto a single I2C bus without some careful design work. It certainly wouldn't work with wires running between breakout boards!

That said, this is an unusual and demanding task, so you shouldn't expect it to be simple.

<= 20 PCA boards stacked (no/short wires) shouldn’t be a big problem.
These are FM+ I2C chips (30mA), so pull up resistors can be low (there are 10k pull up resistors on each board).
Leo…

With 10k pull-up resistors on each board, you're limited to 10 boards before you drop under the minimum 1k as in the specifications.

Another major issue (especially when using breakout boards) will be the bus capacitance. Just the pin capacitance of the ICs themselves is bound to exceed the limit if you have 128 of them. That in turn limits the bus speed, and makes it even harder to address all those port expanders.

wvmarle: With 10k pull-up resistors on each board, you're limited to 10 boards before you drop under the minimum 1k as in the specifications.

What specification. AFAIK common I2C (3mA) is a theoretical minimum of ~1667ohm@5volt (5/0.003).

I did mention FM+ That's a 30mA/4000pf standard. Leo..

I recall I2C specs demand 1-10k pull-up resistors. Will have to dig it up, memory may be failing (or the 1k is based on 3.3V bus?)

At 4000 pF max capacitance you should be able to add a few more indeed :) Doesn't make it much less of a project, though... 1,000 outputs is just too many.

wvmarle:
…or the 1k is based on 3.3V bus?..

…1,000 outputs is just too many.

= 1k would just be ok for standard I2C (most small devices are) on a 3.3volt bus.

Would be cool to see (and hear) 1000 servos move.
Curious what a 6volt/1000Amp supply (and the wiring) would look like.
Leo…

There are FPGA chips with 1000 or more IO pins. They seem to start at about $3000 each.

It’s not a particularly practical way to make a big system. If you need to control 1000 servos, you should be thinking about networking and synchronizing a bunch of smaller boards, like a Cubatron Jr or one of the many (these days) over-the-top christmas light displays.