Is it possible to use rasberry PI for arduino?

I will create a arduino robot with speech recognition with Bitvoicer, with Bitvoicer you need to
have your computer powerd on to make it work, and i don’t want that. So i wounder if it
would work to have bitvoicer on a rasberry PI?

A Raspberry PI is a PC in a small space. If Bitvoicer works with Linux there is a fair possibility it will work on a PI. But this question needs to be asked on a PI forum.

...R

No - you can't put BitVoicer on a Raspberry Pi because it appears that BitVoicer is a Windows-only application, and the RPi will not run Windows.

So you have a couple of options:

1) Find and buy a small enough PC that can run Windows (maybe a nano-itx board?)

2) Find another solution for the Raspberry Pi

Option 1 is the "brute force" approach - throw enough money and time at something, and you can get that square peg into the round hole. But it's not very elegant - that said, if time is more important than money here, it's a viable option that should be investigated.

Option 2 - while more elegant - is also likely going to be something of a "hack-fest" - in other words, you'll have to do some work likely to get it running smoothly. First, you need to find a speech recognition system that will run on the Raspberry Pi - and since a lot (but not all!) RPi development is done in Python, you might want something that supports it.

Fortunately, you are in luck, as there is such a package from Carnegie Mellon University called CMU Sphinx:

http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/wiki/download/

...and it has Python bindings:

http://softwarerecs.stackexchange.com/questions/3844/python-speech-recognition-library

...and it can be used with the Raspberry Pi:

http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/wiki/raspberrypi

So - if you set that up, configure it properly - then code your stuff in Python, and them use the Python serial interface to talk with the Arduino - plus a bit of code on the Arduino to take your comm protocol (personally, I would just use Firmata or something similar on the Arduino, rather than rolling your own, unless you have something special going on.

It won't have a nice and pretty GUI or anything like that, but it likely will work pretty well, and you'll likely learn a ton from the process.

cr0sh: No - you can't put BitVoicer on a Raspberry Pi because it appears that BitVoicer is a Windows-only application, and the RPi will not run Windows.

So you have a couple of options:

1) Find and buy a small enough PC that can run Windows (maybe a nano-itx board?)

2) Find another solution for the Raspberry Pi

Option 1 is the "brute force" approach - throw enough money and time at something, and you can get that square peg into the round hole. But it's not very elegant - that said, if time is more important than money here, it's a viable option that should be investigated.

Option 2 - while more elegant - is also likely going to be something of a "hack-fest" - in other words, you'll have to do some work likely to get it running smoothly. First, you need to find a speech recognition system that will run on the Raspberry Pi - and since a lot (but not all!) RPi development is done in Python, you might want something that supports it.

Fortunately, you are in luck, as there is such a package from Carnegie Mellon University called CMU Sphinx:

http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/wiki/download/

...and it has Python bindings:

http://softwarerecs.stackexchange.com/questions/3844/python-speech-recognition-library

...and it can be used with the Raspberry Pi:

http://cmusphinx.sourceforge.net/wiki/raspberrypi

So - if you set that up, configure it properly - then code your stuff in Python, and them use the Python serial interface to talk with the Arduino - plus a bit of code on the Arduino to take your comm protocol (personally, I would just use Firmata or something similar on the Arduino, rather than rolling your own, unless you have something special going on.

It won't have a nice and pretty GUI or anything like that, but it likely will work pretty well, and you'll likely learn a ton from the process.

Whut?! I think i've seen Raspberry PIs with windows XP, if it is not windows XP, what operating system does it have? If it's linux, i can install wineHQ to run windows applications on a linux distro.

No you have not seen a Raspberry Pi running Windows, there was one joke picture of that a long time ago.

The Pi will run Linux and RISC OS, look at the downloads page on the Pi website.

Grumpy_Mike:
No you have not seen a Raspberry Pi running Windows, there was one joke picture of that a long time ago.

The Pi will run Linux and RISC OS, look at the downloads page on the Pi website.

Oh so it can run linux? :smiley:
Then i can install winehq on it to run windows applications on the linux operating system!
It would actually work!

You can't just use any Linux distro, it has to be an ARM distro.

TutorialNom: Then i can install winehq on it to run windows applications on the linux operating system!

Maybe or maybe not.

Just the same way as I could learn to speak Spanish.

A RaspberryPi is a very small Linux computer. It has limited Ram and processor speed.

...R

TutorialNom: It would actually work!

It might take about a month to boot Windows XP. Emulation is slow. The Pi is slow. Emulating on a Pi is slow-slow.

TutorialNom: Oh so it can run linux? :D Then i can install winehq on it to run windows applications on the linux operating system! It would actually work!

http://www.raspberrypi.org/help/faqs/#softwareX86

Also:

http://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewtopic.php?t=12727

Do your research - while you might be able to get Wine to compile on an ARM CPU, running x86 binaries is a different challenge. Note that "W)ine I)s N)ot an E)mulator" - as such, it relies upon parts of the x86 architecture for pre-compiled programs to work. Since you won't be able to get the source code to BitVoicer, it may or may not work.

That's all on top of the speed issue.

I'm not trying to dissuade you - maybe you'll make some kind of breakthrough? I'm just trying to lay out some facts and information so you can make an informed choice on what to do next.