Is there an "reverse" mosfet?

Hello,
I searched for an "reverse" mosfet, that means 230v supplied to switch 5.5v or so. But I cannot find something like that.

Divide the 230V down, and use a regular MOSFET

TheMemberFormerlyKnownAsAWOL:
Divide the 230V down, and use a regular MOSFET

Ok

Please be careful

TheMemberFormerlyKnownAsAWOL:
Please be careful

Yes, I am.
I never do something on electronics when voltage is supplied. In worst case the main switch turns off, I have to disconnect the circuit and turn the main switch on, again.

Don’t forget an extractor fan and blast screen.

Divide the 230V down, and use a regular MOSFET

Show your work.

Is that the power line? If so, where is the 5V going? If you are connecting to the Arduino or other low-voltage circuitry, or if you or some other person can "touch" that circuitry it should be electrically isolated (no physical connection between the power line and the low-voltage side). That can be optical isolation, transformer isolation (if it's AC), or a relay.

The easiest way is a relay with a 230V coil. A relay is an electrically-isolated, electrically-operated switch so it can be wired-up on the low-voltage side like any other switch/pushbutton.

I searched for an "reverse" mosfet, that means 230v supplied to switch 5.5v

What does this mean ?

Are saying you are looking for a mosfet that can be driven by 230vac to switch a DC load ?

Divide the 230V down, and use a regular MOSFET

Show your finished mosfet driver interface circuit.

Wait - who mentioned AC?

Wait - who mentioned AC?

That was my assumption. (of course I could just be jumping to conclusions…)
Where do you see 230Vdc ? (230V is a common ac value is it now ?)

I could use an bridge rectifier and I have 230V DC. That is no Problem.

electronicsnoob:
I could use an bridge rectifier and I have 230V DC.

I think I’m getting the full flavour of your nick.

I could use an bridge rectifier and I have 230V DC. That is no Problem.

So was I right in assuming it was AC or what ?

I could use an bridge rectifier and I have 230V DC. That is no Problem.

I don't think so. I think you forgot something.

Converting AC to DC Voltage Mathematically

Calculate the "peak" voltage output by multiplying the given "rms" (root mean square) voltage value by 1.4, or the square root of two. For example, an AC voltage of 10 volts (rms) will have a peak voltage of 14 volts.

By my calculations you would get 322Vdc. (SQRT(2)*230VAC=322Vdc)

Frankly, I think an optoisolator would be a much better choice and less work.

"I think I'm getting the full flavour of your nick."
What does this mean ?

Technically yes there is, there N-Channel and P-Channel MOSFETs available in the voltage range you are looking at.
I am guessing you want to switch the high side. The source would be on the +220 and the gate is referenced to that, The gate has a Vgs rating in the range of 15V. That is telling you if the voltage difference between the gate and source exceeds this value the FET will be damaged and eventually fail. An opto isolator would make the interface safer and a lot easier then doing high voltage with semiconductors. Remember if it is a 220V mains lines that is a nominal RMS voltage. Do the math and you will be very tight with a 400V mosfet. The gate drive circuit will be a bit difficult if isolation is needed. If it is the AC mains consider a triack. I would suggest getting a good book on basic electronics and learn what parts are for and what they are called.
Good Luck & Have Fun!
Gil

Technically yes there is, there N-Channel and P-Channel MOSFETs available in the voltage range you are looking at.
I am guessing you want to switch the high side. The source would be on the +220 and the gate is referenced to that, The gate has a Vgs rating in the range of 15V. That is telling you if the voltage difference between the gate and source exceeds this value the FET will be damaged and eventually fail. An opto isolator would make the interface safer and a lot easier then doing high voltage with semiconductors. Remember if it is a 220V mains lines that is a nominal RMS voltage. Do the math and you will be very tight with a 400V mosfet. The gate drive circuit will be a bit difficult if isolation is needed. If it is the AC mains consider a triack. I would suggest getting a good book on basic electronics and learn what parts are for and what they are called.

All true, except for the fact that OP wants to use 230vac TO SWITCH 5.5Vdc.

XY problem strikes yet again!

Paul__B:
XY problem strikes yet again!

No it is not an XY problem! I just wanted to know if there exist something like a "reverse" mosfet! Nothing else! I said 5.5V and 230V because they are standard voltages used for arduino Projects! I thought such a mosfet would be useful for some of my future projects.

I said 5.5V and 230V because they are standard voltages used for arduino Projects!

You really are earning that nick.

Please, get some education before you hurt yourself.

I said 5.5V and 230V because they are standard voltages used for arduino Projects!

Since when is 230V a standard voltage used with arduino projects ?
Where on Earth did you get that idea from ?