L293DNE instead of L293D?

Hi everyone! I'd like to buy a L293D motor driver but I can't find it on the usual site where I buy stuff (can I tell the name?). What seems most similar is L293DNE. For basic use, could they be the same?

Thank you!

L293DNE is superior... it's the same chip but it's for commercial use. Good for 0-70°C rated... the other is not. Also I believe the leads have better plating.

The L293 chips are very old technology. There are much better MOSFET output drivers available. Pololu has a variety of motor drivers.

I prefer L298N, although I haven't used those motor drivers.
L298N can power your Arduino, which I think is very useful

Depends on your application, but if you have more than 12V, then you cant power your arduino. also, it has a power drop of 2v

jppboi:
I prefer L298N...

Same old technology, with the same high losses (typical 3.7volt@2Amp).
Ok for experiments, poor choice for final projects.
Leo..

jppboi:
L298N can power your Arduino, which I think is very useful

Some modules have a linear regulator on board, and that way offer a 5V output.

However that won't work well if you use voltages well over 12V, which you typically should to compensate for the massive voltage losses of the L298N and similar chips.

groundFungus:
The L293 chips are very old technology. There are much better MOSFET output drivers available. Pololu has a variety of motor drivers.

Very interesting... Are these called "shields"? What's the difference between this and a simple L293D ic?

"DRV8801 Single Brushed DC Motor Driver Carrier" seems to be the modern version of L293D.

Anyway, I'm just experimenting, nothing serious... So L293D would be ok... That's what they use in my beginner kit...

run what you got... as you get further into this you start to look at the datasheets and notice things like peak current and what the IC uses to control things... etc (running bigger motors and being more efficient with conserving power)

The biggest difference between them:

L293 - uses darlingtons to drive the motors and have about 600mA - 1A limit
DRV8870 - uses N-Channel MOSFETS and can support up to 3.5 A (I'm sure that will need a heat sink)

I'm sure there may be other differences but I haven't dug any further

Currently I'm working on a DC motor project that doesn't even require an H Bridge... it's low power and I'm using an opamp and some bigger transistors.

wolframore:
L293 - uses darlingtons to drive the motors and have about 600mA - 1A limit
DRV8870 - uses N-Channel MOSFETS and can support up to 3.5 A (I'm sure that will need a heat sink)

Very interesting...

Thank you!

wolframore:
run what you got... as you get further into this you start to look at the datasheets and notice things like peak current and what the IC uses to control things... etc

Great, yeah, I'm seeing that everything is explained in datasheet, cool!

wolframore:
L293 - uses darlingtons to drive the motors and have about 600mA - 1A limit

Definitely needs a heat sink: 3-4V drop means 2-3W dissipation per channel at 600 mA, 3-4W at 1A. Run two motors at 1A and you have 6-8W of heat to deal with.

The DRV8870 datasheet lists a 565 mΩ on resistance, that's 0.2W per channel at 600 mA, 0.6W at 1A, and 7.3W at the maximum 3.6A - rated for peak, don't see the continuous rating. But you need one per motor, while the L296 runs two motors.

Another one is the TB6612FNG, a dual H-bridge rated up to 3.2A peak and 1.2A continuous, 0.5Ω on resistance so very similar to the DRV8870. I've used the thing without heat sink for a small two-wheel robot running off 2xLiPo.

You would think they can get Rds down a bit more, it would be better to run them off outboard mosfets.

Indeed. Probably a manufacturing limitation.

Choice between one IC (cheap to make; cheap to assemble) and a bunch of discrete components (less cheap to make, far less cheap to assemble).

For a 1A H-bridge 0.5 Ohm is good enough.

You have a point there, 1A is useful for many things... until you get to bigger and hungrier motors. With such amazing ICs being built I’m amazed it drops that much when they’re fully on. It’s the PFETs that’s the issue. I’m sure it won’t we long til they have 5A or higher chips soon... like these 100 watt class D amps on a tiny chip... it’s amazing.

Both the TB6612FNG and DRV8870 use 2xNMOS for the output stages, with apparently an internal boost circuit to get the voltage high enough to switch them on.

TB6612FNG Datasheet shows standard H bridge with P and N Mosfets for the output.

The DRV8870 is done with 4 NMOS, how it should be... this ones interesting.

With switching losses with PWM it’s hard to get much better currently without big heat sinks, paralleling and discrete circuits.