Laptop shut down won't turn on anymore

Hi everyone, i am currently follweing a project involving 3D printing. I used a nema 17 stepper a arduino mega and an ramps 1.4 control panel. I also use 8825 Drivers for the stsppers. I tested a lot on school with this and worked great but at one different power supply i started having problems. At one point my arduino mega was burned tought the probllem was a collegue who switched + & -. After buying a new one it just worked all fine again, after we tested at the same power supply where we had troubles before my hot end wasnt warming up and my 8825 started getting hot, also the power supply started to make a ticking nice. At this point my laptop shut down and i cant put it on anymore. I tried putting it out for a time and start up without battery but only the lights on my lenovo laptop goes on nothing else. Is there still hope fore my laptop?

Hey Donkokkie, welcome.

A power supply which makes a ticking noise, probably is going into over-current protection mode and when trying to recover from that, it will go straight back into that mode again, hence the noise.
So that suggests an over-current or even a short circuit.
This can be prevented by using fuses which will sacrifice it's life to protect both power supply and the load connected to it.

It's possible that the 5 volts and/or GND lines inside your laptop are damaged due to the problems you had.
But trouble like this usually require multiple problems combined instead of just a single one.
It's well possible for you to not notice a single problem, until multiple problems cascade and currents start flowing in ways they weren't supposed to go.

Your USB 5 volt line is supposed to be fused inside your laptop, but i wouldn't know for Lenovo laptops (i won't touch those).
Lenovo laptops find their origin at IBM, and that should mean things like these should be present.
But you never know what parts are omitted in order to build cheaper laptops.

The GND lines are not protected by any fuses.
In case a GND line is blown, you should expect a total loss.
Because a reliable repair will be hard to do and therefore too expensive.

Your post, as well as your name makes me think your native language might be Dutch, like mine is.
In that case see my signoff messages below.

Donkokkie:
Is there still hope for my laptop?

Nothing connected to USB ports, laptop will not start?

Probably not.

Wrong forum.

Look for one about best repair services for Lenovo laptops.

Donkokkie:
the power supply started to make a ticking nice. At this point my laptop shut down and i cant put it on anymore. I tried putting it out for a time and start up without battery but only the lights on my lenovo laptop goes on nothing else. Is there still hope fore my laptop?

You mention 'power supply' making a ticking noise. How many power supplies are you talking about altogether in your post? Two power supplies right? One for powering your stepper motors. And the other external one for powering your laptop?

Is there any hope for the laptop? There's always hope, naturally. It just depends what failed. It's hard to say what failed. Maybe only the laptop servicing people can trace the issue. They usually follow a procedure.... eg....confirm the issue, followed by maybe taking your AC/DC power supply (for your laptop) and see if it powers some other laptop (compatible one). Or they might do some measurements on the motherboard or USB ports, to see if any terminals appear to be shorted when they're not supposed to be. And if the USB ports are module ones .... not part of the main motherboard, then they could even disconnect the USB module internally...and see if the laptop starts up. Plus other usual little procedures. Some motherboards have little surface mount component fuses ... things like that.

Powered USB hubs are a way to protect a laptop from faults in USB devices that might over-voltage
the USB 5V rail, which may be what has happened here.

If you suspect any issue with power supplies, disconnect everything, measure voltages, and connect
things one at a time checking for overload, voltage dropouts etc.

If someone connected +/- wrong, there isn't much hope alas. Check everything twice before applying power,
always use colour coded wiring, and if possible make power connectors keyed or asymmetrical so mis-connection
is physically prevented.