Laws of the Forum

I wonder if anyone has discovered any Forum laws. I will kick it off with this one:-

If the title says weird behavior then inevitably the behavior will be perfectly normal.

This one is directed to one of the higher ranking members of the forum

at least read the effing title, hopefully on a good day the entire post, your experience does not equal every possible situation.

(and no I don't mean you GM, you are an invaluable windbag of grumpyness)

at least read the effing title

While that may not have been directed at me it certainly sounds like me. Far too often I start a reply after reading just the keywords in the last sentence. ADD (aka ADHD) is an evil mistress.

If the title says weird behavior then inevitably the behavior will be perfectly normal.

No doubt!

[quote author=Coding Badly link=topic=99479.msg746039#msg746039 date=1333344980]

at least read the effing title

While that may not have been directed at me it certainly sounds like me.

[/quote]

it was not ;)

  • The frustration of the student is inverse to the days until the deadline.

  • noobs like typing long initialization lists more than reading about arrays

  • 2K RAM ought to be enough for anybody.

:)

Grumpy_Mike: I wonder if anyone has discovered any Forum laws. I will kick it off with this one:-

If the title says weird behavior then inevitably the behavior will be perfectly normal.

Law #2: You can't judge a post by it's title.

Lefty

"The amount of punctuation in the title is in inverse proportion to the difficulty of the problem"

AWOL: "The amount of punctuation in the title is in inverse proportion to the difficulty of the problem"

In other words :"this is a really difficult problem"

Law: "If I don't like the answer, the writer is not up to my level." 8)

Best regards Jantje

In other words :"this is a really difficult problem"

No, I'm thinking more of the sort of problem that has the title "Why is my servo twitching all the time ?????!!!!?"

It's a little like Mike's Law of Weirdness stated above.

I have a suggestion since the topic seems to be very popular, and again and again attracts the same kind of rhetoric replies (fictional hobby tinker people who actually fry LEDs regularily). Not only here on this forum.

A really simple one line forum rule "Fry LEDs at your own risk".

Actually I only participate in a few, specific sub-forums, simply I have not much to say at the one's where I am not participating.

"at least read the effing title"- isn't it effin'? Moreover sometimes indeed the title is effin', such as "Urgent help required". It really occurs regularily all over the web forums, people include "Thank you" plus their name plus even their phone numbers, as well "Quick replies are very appreciated".

Effin' really is the exact term for this.

One real law really could be "Don't disturb the forum with too many replies". Only participate in sub-forums that relate to your own real-world activities. Unless you are an established guru already.

I do my best to help with things that I feel comfortable with. I let people know if I am not sure. Here is a quote from WESTFW that explains why people should help when they can mainly, the last couple sentences.

I was supposed to write an "Instructable" on using optiLoader, with pictures and videos and easy to follow steps. But that got sidetracked somehow (mostly, it kept getting more complicated the more I thought about it.) Until then, I'm "doomed" to answer questions on a case-by-case basis. On the good side: 1) Seeing and answering questions helps clarify what needs to be documented. 2) Several other people are also answering questions about optiLoader and bootloading in general, so the "doom" gets spread around until its not really bad at all. (which is GREAT, and a fine example of the way an open source community is supposed to work.)

There will be many "invisible" posts on every large forum- where the poster originally wrote a reply, but then clicked the close button because the poster was afraid of becoming banned. These posts don't really exist physically so what should they become called?

I guess the OP had something in mind like "self contained laws of the forum"?

If a post or poster annoys me, it is probably better not to reply.

Sometimes, even after I have typed a clever and technically accurate response, it is better to abort my posting and pretend you never saw the question.

Questions that have already be adequately answered do not necessarily benefit from me saying the same thing.

Questions that have already be adequately answered do not necessarily benefit from me saying the same thing.

I used to feel that way, but "they" changed the search functionality in such a way that it almost feels needed. (though google sucked as well, I dont know why a SMF search wont let you limit your requirements ... oh wait ... it does its just blobbed up there with the top bar where no one ever freaking looks)

This made me smile -

Sometimes, even after I have typed a clever and technically accurate response, it is better to abort my posting and pretend you never saw the question.

Duane B

DuaneB: This made me smile -

Sometimes, even after I have typed a clever and technically accurate response, it is better to abort my posting and pretend you never saw the question.

Duane B

Been there, done that. ;)

Also must remember to resist correcting the correctors, unless if does really add important value. Sometimes I succumb, sometimes I don't.

On the positive side, many members strike a commendable balance between giving the answer and giving the information to find the answer. In the short time that I have been around the forum I have never seen it formalised anywhere, it just seems to be the spirit of the forum, its great, keep it up.

Duane B

One of the laws that should be there is this - When asking for help, don't really be asking me to solve your problem(s) for you.

Don't you just love those posts where someone, generally with little knowledge and seemingly no desire to at least load and tinker with the example programs, asks for solutions to a problem that they haven't even analyzed...

I think that in many places the Education system is more Answer based than process based.

Another Law for the Forum -

What you make is less important than what you Learned!

DuaneB: On the positive side, many members strike a commendable balance between giving the answer and giving the information to find the answer. In the short time that I have been around the forum I have never seen it formalised anywhere, it just seems to be the spirit of the forum, its great, keep it up.

Duane B

Every living forum has a hidden self-inherent purpose or goal. Usually these include to cooperate towards financial improvement. So you lay out your action that all people can do their business without too much trolling or distrubing on purpose.

Trolls randomly add adverts, unrelated random word chains containing url's, and one big brand sign of trolls is spelling URL's two times.

They can bring down a forum if they become too many.

And every forum originally needs a critical mass to start off.

From zero, forums take years even to have a few members.

So it's often inherent from the original core group.

Generally, forums contain automatic rules that enforce sense of community, common sense, and kind of self censorship. Other's unfortunately really allow graphical violence and this qualifies communities as unprofessional.

Every social and friendly forum should declare "About Us", including where the admins come from. At least the country, and what they do for a living. You can't really trust made up handles.

The admins here on Arduino have at least experienced a moderation process, that made them Admins.

Some admininstrated forums are sensible against any kind of pattern that they have not seen before. So if a new member starts to talk in a pattern they don't know, and correlations they don't understand, these people get into trouble.

That's really a complex digital feedback network that interacts with the human mind, but there are some theories about these dynamics.

Other's unfortunately really allow graphical violence and this qualifies communities as unprofessional.

I'm not sure that graphic (or even graphical) violence has ever been a problem here.

Funny how a humorous thread about observed laws (note, not rules) has drifted off topic.