LED display???

Hello guys and congrats about this forum

I an new to the community of electronics, and I have just learnt about this forum :slight_smile:

Since newbie, I would like to accomplish a simple task.....

I want to construct an array of leds, say 20 x 10(many colours) that the could be turned on in various time intervals and not all of them at the same time and duration....

In other words...some leds (random number), turned on at random time, for random duration, and for random brightness steady value during the ON-state(each one separate).
A kind of mess....:slight_smile: but It would be beautifull :slight_smile:

I have the leds and the board...the controller is missing. SO.... I decided that I need a reprogrammable controller. Which is arduino!!!
I like also C#.
I got into the site of arduino....I have seen the models but I can't choose which one fits in my situation :frowning:

I think Arduino nano, or Arduino Duemilanove, or Arduino Diecimila fit the most.....(I am not sure 100%)

Since it is a kind of programmer I would like to turn on the leds....one line (vertical, horizontial, 1 in sets of 2, 1 in sets of 3, etc.... ) any kind .... (by the use of C# of course)
I want to be aple to reprogram the C-code in order to turn on the leds in various scenarios

The final question is... which one arduino should I choose.... in order to fullfil my expectations?

Afterwards I want to construct a complicated circuit (multiplexer) for the NXT-brick (the controller from the series lego mindstorms). In fact I want to construct a servo-motor-multiplexer... Is it possbile with arduino????
(NXT's interface with the motors is rj12-modificated-wire-order... so, as input, there would be one rj12 socket, and as output 2 or more rj12 with multiplexion time division (about 5 ms on each channell)
This seams wonderfull idea, and would be aprreciated by ALL the fans of LEGO :slight_smile:

I know that some would be implied with a chip programmer and Karnaught etc..... (I want to make something more interesting, which is the above ones)

Any answer would be veeeeeeeeery help full,
T3rmy

The Arduino tools use C++ and C, but not C#. The latter depends a lot on dynamic memory allocation on modern computers, so it’s not likely going to be supported on tiny platforms like microcontrollers.

The task you outline means “200 independently addressable lights.” This is possible with the Arduino, but only with some additional hardware to manage the current loads or light-addressing. There are many projects like this all over the forum, so happy reading. :slight_smile:

The NXT devices talk a protocol called I2C, which is also supported by Arduino. It would be an interesting task to make an I2C-controlled I2C bus router. Not sure how much freedom the NXT software has to support new classes of devices.

The Arduino tools use C++ and C, but not C#. The latter depends a lot on dynamic memory allocation on modern computers, so it’s not likely going to be supported on tiny platforms like microcontrollers.

ok, then C :slight_smile:

The task you outline means “200 independently addressable lights.” This is possible with the Arduino, but only with some additional hardware to manage the current loads or light-addressing. There are many projects like this all over the forum, so happy reading. :slight_smile:

you mean by a multiplexer???

The NXT devices talk a protocol called I2C, which is also supported by Arduino. It would be an interesting task to make an I2C-controlled I2C bus router. Not sure how much freedom the NXT software has to support new classes of devices.

I don’t know much about I2C protocol, is there any tutorial???
is there any ready datasheet for the I2C-controlled I2C bus router ? or at least a prototype???

The main question still remains… WHICH arduino it suitable for me?

Multiplexing is just one way for managing the lights.

I2C has several examples; read through the tutorials and do some google homework. http://arduino.cc/en/Tutorial/HomePage - no, your idea of switching I2C buses on and off is a fresh new idea of your very own. Run out and patent it! :slight_smile: We did have a discussion on how to do part of this in the past, but it was a bit jerry-rigged.

So far that you've mentioned, any Arduino and almost any of the Arduino-clones would work. If you are just starting out, just get the standard Arduino Duemilanove.

I intend to make a mini circuit that could be attached in something bigger I have been already constructing. So if it was small (eg Arduino nano, it would be nice :))
Is there any section that compares the capabilities of all arduino models?

Also...in order to use multiplexing, I will need a chip programmer, won't I?

Is that , I was trying to avoid.... Can't the job be done only with arduino and a couple of leds? Will I definitely need some extra circuits?

Also...in order to use multiplexing, I will need a chip programmer, won't I?

No the arduino contains a bootloader program so it programmes itself over the USB / Serial link. It is only if you screw up the bootloader by writing over it (arrays out of bounds and that sort of thing) that you need a chip programmer.

The official Arduino Nano is a 5v device - http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoBoardNano

And very cute with it...

This is the closest thing I've seen to a comparison of all the boards: http://arduino.cc/en/Main/Hardware

Andrew

The official Arduino Nano is a 5v device

Sorry so it is. Response above modified.

I’ve owned the Nano (It was my first arduino actually. It’s kind of funny, I first programmed it with my eeePC, what a coincidence… I recently blew it out somehow, all the analog pins are gone afaik) and I happen to like the adafruit BoArduino better because of its simplicity and use of through-hole components. It’s also much cheaper, even when you buy the special USB cable. It’s bigger, but since the BoArduino is a kit, you can either put it directly on a board using the male headers or wire it up using stranded wire only using the pins you need.

You can save space by not installing unimportant parts like the 2x3 header, indicator LEDS/resistors, power jack, regulator (if you have power elsewhere), etc.

Here’s mine, I have yet to do anything with it rather than blink an LED to test it.