Led Power supply

Hi.

if I want to turn 512 rgb 5050 leds at full bright, according to my search i woud need...

20 milliamp per led, 60ma per pixel, that would need a 5v 30amp power supply.....right?

Should I plug it?

Moris526:
Hi.

if I want to turn 512 rgb 5050 leds at full bright, according to my search i woud need...

20 milliamp per led, 60ma per pixel, that would need a 5v 30amp power supply.....right?

Should I plug it?

What do you mean "plug it".
5V 30A power supply, would mean a Switched Mode Power Supply.
Do you want to control the LEDs in some way?
Tom.... :slight_smile:

But what LEDs are these?

WS2812/ NeoPixel/ APA102 "addressable" LEDs or a RGB strip?

Your calculation is correct, but a critical point is that for strips you need to feed power in every 50 LEDs or so.

Thanks for the answer. Sorry for the lack of info.

I have 32 Adafruit Neotrellis PCB units soldered together.

They probably will never be all at full brightness at the same time, but want to be covered.

I will control it with Arduino Uno.

One more newbie question. With a proper power supply do i still need resistor or other component?

I have to ask - why do you imagine you might need a resistor? :astonished:

You now have a vastly different question; you have a fully-implemented module. Its peak current draw is 960 mA, just under one Amp. You solder them together in a matrix - presumably four by eight though I can imagine a 16 by 2 “keyboard”.

I gather you solder them together using pieces of bare component wire - it looks a fiddly process. While all adjacent modules should be connected together, I would suggest you need to connect in power - 5 V and ground - using heavier cable at least every group of 6 or 8 modules.

I am not sure how you arrange the distinct addresses of 32 modules! Or in fact, how practical it is to put all 32 on an I2C bus. :roll_eyes: Yes, you have to have pull-up resistors on the I2C bus but really no more than two pairs of resistors for the whole bus - which incidentally appears likely to operate on 3.3 V rather than 5.

Paul__B:
I have to ask - why do you imagine you might need a resistor? :astonished:

You now have a vastly different question; you have a fully-implemented module. Its peak current draw is 960 mA, just under one Amp. You solder them together in a matrix - presumably four by eight though I can imagine a 16 by 2 “keyboard”.

I gather you solder them together using pieces of bare component wire - it looks a fiddly process. While all adjacent modules should be connected together, I would suggest you need to connect in power - 5 V and ground - using heavier cable at least every group of 6 or 8 modules.

I am not sure how you arrange the distinct addresses of 32 modules! Or in fact, how practical it is to put all 32 on an I2C bus. :roll_eyes: Yes, you have to have pull-up resistors on the I2C bus but really no more than two pairs of resistors for the whole bus - which incidentally appears likely to operate on 3.3 V rather than 5.

Thanks for your time

The resistor question flows from my ignorance, that doesnt goes as far as to burn everything up for not asking.

The adressing is given by jumpers.

Good tip about 4 different power supplys

Thank you mate

Moris526:
The addressing is given by jumpers.

For 32 devices, you need five jumpers. Are there that many? :roll_eyes:

Paul__B:
For 32 devices, you need five jumpers. Are there that many? :roll_eyes:

Yes. There are 5.