lifetime Arduino

Hi everybody
I need to use Arduino Uno in my company to automate some process, this card will be connected more than one year, and my question is Arduino can be work continuously for 1 year without any breakdown. Is it possible calculate the lifetime of Arduino?
The second question If you know any other card more efficient than Arduino and can be used in plant please send me the link or just the name of the card.

naoufel-78:
my question is Arduino can be work continuously for 1 year without any breakdown. Is it possible calculate the lifetime of Arduino?

The two answers are "possibly" and "yes".

Everything fails at some point in time, so you can either design for failure (expensive), or simply have spare units sitting on a shelf (perhaps less expensive). If your company is out of action for one hour due to a hardware failure, how much money will you loose, $100, $1000, $10,000?

Automotive or aerospace grade components will give you a longer MTBF at a correspondingly higher price.

A bigger issue is the software you write for it. It's easy to write software that works, but which isn't robust and will crash randomly when unexpected things happen. It's much harder to write good software that keeps running despite unexpected inputs and events.

My guess is that it's much more likely for the software to fail and stop running (or reset in the middle of some operation) than it is for the board itself to fail.

I have a breadoard Atmega328 running 24/7 for about 2 years now.

...R

naoufel-78:
Hi everybody
I need to use Arduino Uno in my company to automate some process, this card will be connected more than one year, and my question is Arduino can be work continuously for 1 year without any breakdown. Is it possible calculate the lifetime of Arduino?
The second question If you know any other card more efficient than Arduino and can be used in plant please send me the link or just the name of the card.

That may give some serious problems for your company unless you are qualified and experienced and it sounds like you are not.

Industrial control is often done with programmable logic controllers designed for the industrial environment, its expensive.

Can you describe more about what you are trying to do.

Solid state electronics fail pretty-much randomly, but average life is very-very long as long as it's not electrically, mechanically, or environmentally abused.

This is from [u]Atmel[/u] and it only applies to the Amel ATmega chip. The more components you add, the higher the chance of a failure and your MTBF is reduced:

Mean Time Between Failures is an indication of the number of hours to pass between failures.

Please find below the predicted MTBF (Mean Time Between Failure) numbers of
our micro's at different temperatures. The statistical calculations are based
on current reliability qualification data in the "microcontroller
reliability data package".

Atmel has been shipping NVM parts for 20 years and Flash Micro's for 13
years. We have never experienced a long term reliability problem.

Here are the MTBF numbers calculated from life test and data retention
results:

65ºC 1.69x10e7 hours. => 1929 years
85ºC 4.46x10e6 hours. => 509 years
105ºC 1.34x10e6 hours. => 153 years

Robin2:
I have a breadoard Atmega328 running 24/7 for about 2 years now.

...R

ok, But could you please explain me what exactly you do with this breadboard ??

What kind of environment will it operate in? Will you put it inside a housing?

"ok, But could you please explain me what exactly you do with this breadboard ??"

I think the real question is, what do you expect to do with your breadboard (arduino).
What environment, etc.

If your question is: will time (2 or 3 years) cause the arduino to fail? The answer is NO.

Arduino uno is Low cost ,so that mean that it's not High quality and I am developer for the Hardware , after any development we pass by Worst case analysis .This analysis give a good idea about lifetime and also a good condition to ensure a long life for the card. Unfortunately this analysis not deliver by Arduino.So how can you be sure that Arduino Uno can be work 2 or 3 years with any fail !!!!

"So how can you be sure that Arduino Uno can be work 2 or 3 years with any fail !!!!"

Well, I can't be sure. Just as I can't be sure that the new automobile I buy for $50,000 will work for 2 or 3 years.
But, I have code resting in $4 arduino boards for a couple years, and when I plug them in: the have always started right up.

If your project is for medical equipment or such, then maybe make a backup system.

naoufel-78:
Arduino uno is Low cost ,so that mean that it's not High quality.

Not true.
Usually things fail because people are using it wrong.
They stuff it inside a hot enclosure, draw too much current from the pins, put it inside a vibrating machine without soldering the wires onto the board, corrosive dust, moisture, wrong supply voltage, etc.
If you do things right, the board will still work in 20years time.
As an experienced consumer electronics tech (seen many failures), I would say the electrolytic SMD supply caps are the first parts that go, especially with elevated temps. The board might still work ok without them.
Leo..

Robin2:
I have a breadoard Atmega328 running 24/7 for about 2 years now.

...R

I have a NANO that lasted about 1 second after I shorted power to ground.

Arduino uno is Low cost ,so that mean that it's not High quality and I am developer for the Hardware , after any development we pass by Worst case analysis .This analysis give a good idea about lifetime and also a good condition to ensure a long life for the card. Unfortunately this analysis not deliver by Arduino.[/quote]If you can do an analysis of your own design, why can't you analyze the Arduino? ...The schematics & bill of materials is public.

So how can you be sure that Arduino Uno can be work 2 or 3 years with any fail !!!!

You can NEVER 100% sure. No matter how carefully design or no matter how much analysis you do there's always some small remaining chance of failure. The best you can do is reduce the odds of a failure to an acceptable level.

As you probably know, it's statistical. ...If you build 100 systems, you can have a very-very low probability of more than one failure over some fixed period of time, etc. But if you only build one, it might fail after one day... It's like winning the lottery or getting bitten by a shark... It's rare, but it can happen. The statistics & odds can be useful, but something with low odds can still happen. Statistics & odds are most useful when the numbers are high... The casino may loose money to you, but overall they are going to make money every day.

If you need high-reliability, I'd recommend building a spare backup system, or have spare parts on hand for quick repair. The Arduino is cheap enough that you can keep one or two spares on-hand.

I'm not a reliability expert, but I've seen systems where everything is redundant and if anything fails the other system keeps running. [u]RAID[/u] works that way. There was once a computer company called [u]Tandem Computers[/u] and EVERYGHING was duplicated... You could disconnect any cable, or pull-out any PC board, or damage any one component and it would just keep running.

There are high-reliability medical and aerospace products/systems that are high-reliability without being redundant, but like I said I'm not an expert and I don't know all of the tricks. I assume that after all of the careful high-reliability design is done the thing is stress tested electrically, mechanically, and environmentally, to make there are no hidden defects/weaknesses.

The schematics & bill of materials is public.

I've never seen a bill of materials published, except as put together by someone like myself.

I have 12 Promini's purchased from Gravitech at my fencing club. We go there 3 times a week typically, power them all up from 12V wallwarts powered from a single power strip, run them 2-3 hours, power them down & leave. Club is kept at 55F during the winter when we're not there, 65F when we are, and gets up in the 90s during the summer (I won't fence above 95F, that's just too warm).
They've been in operation since Jan 2011.

naoufel-78:
Arduino uno is Low cost ,so that mean that it's not High quality and I am developer for the Hardware , after any development we pass by Worst case analysis .This analysis give a good idea about lifetime and also a good condition to ensure a long life for the card. Unfortunately this analysis not deliver by Arduino.So how can you be sure that Arduino Uno can be work 2 or 3 years with any fail !!!!

Statements like this are meaningless unless you describe the test conditions in detail.
And, if I was Atmel, I would be having a word with my lawyers.

ok, But could you please explain me what exactly you do with this breadboard ??

It controls my 230v fridge via a relay. The fridge is powered from a quasi-sine-wave inverter and its internal thermostat does not work well with that.

...R

Wawa:
Not true.
Usually things fail because people are using it wrong.
They stuff it inside a hot enclosure, draw too much current from the pins, put it inside a vibrating machine without soldering the wires onto the board, corrosive dust, moisture, wrong supply voltage, etc.
If you do things right, the board will still work in 20years time.
As an experienced consumer electronics tech (seen many failures), I would say the electrolytic SMD supply caps are the first parts that go, especially with elevated temps. The board might still work ok without them.
Leo..

Assuming its a genuine arduino.

Some of the clones may not have the build quality and QA.
I saw a comment somewhere here where components have fallen off those.

naoufel-78:
Arduino uno is Low cost ,so that mean that it's not High quality

No its low cost because its made in quantity by competing firms for a large market.

Quality depends on the individual manufacturer.