Linear switch remote control?

Hey guys,

I have a project I am interested in designing and building for my home theater, and I figured it may involve servos. I am trying to toggle a switch on the back of a pair of speakers via remote control.

The speakers are physically out of reach, so I'd like to control a switch on the back of them (possibly with a linear servo?)

I would also need something to plug into the arduino to enable remote control from a Harmony remote or something similar to actually perform the action.

Here is something I found for a remote control: (would this work?)

Also, here's a servo I found. Is this what I would need? overkill? underkill?

http://bit.ly/1zpEdW1

Here is the photo of the speakers I wish to control:

http://united-music.by/images/8965.jpg

It may be hard to see, but the top switch on the back that says "input" is what I would need to toggle, as I would have both types of connections active in my setup.

I have a background in programming and a degree in electrical engineering, so I believe I can hit the ground running once I figure out the mechanical aspects of it.

Any suggestions on approach or links to equipment would be great. Thanks!

Can you get at the wiring to the switch and perhaps use a relay to act as a parallel switch?

There is a library (can't remember the name) for Arduino's to recognize a large number of infra-red remotes. Google should find stuff about it.

...R

pianofreq:
It may be hard to see, but the top switch on the back that says "input" is what I would need to toggle, as I would have both types of connections active in my setup.

I read it as input select, which makes the suggestion to intercept the feed to the speakers redundant.
Maybe you can find a service manual for the speakers (at the Roland site?) and find out how the switch is connected.
You might then be able to replace it with a relay.

I have a background in programming and a degree in electrical engineering, so I believe I can hit the ground running once I figure out the mechanical aspects of it.

Any suggestions on approach or links to equipment would be great

Would it be silly to ask why someone with a degree in Electrical Engineering wouldn't remove the six screws
to look at the switch to see if it is really a DPDT or simply an SPST used to pull a uC input low ?