Litz wire

Folks,

Anyone ever use Litz wire? I need a very thin and flexible wire.

Litz wire comes labeled as 40/44 or 105/40. I'm assuming the second number is the total gauge of all the individual strands. Is this correct?

Could I use 40ga Litz wire to power one LED which draws 20mA? A best guess is welcome.

Thank you.

Tony

Could I use 40ga Litz wire to power one LED which draws 20mA? A best guess is welcome.

Best guess: YES.

Try it, let us know what happens.

Litz wire has individual, insulated, wire strands. Almost impossible to remove the insulation without using chemical means that dissolve the insulation. Unless you can do that, expect connection troubles.

Paul

[u]40 AWG wire is rated for 90mA[/u] when used for "chassis wiring" (short wire runs).

I've run across Litz wire a few times when trying to replace a broken connector an a pre-made audio cable. It was nearly impossible to solder and I didn't know what kind of chemical you're supposed to use to "clean" it. I don't actually remember if I was successful...

The Litz wire I have run across is used in intermediate (radio) frequency transformers. The super flexible audio cable uses copper ribbon conductors wrapped around a cotton string, and thus is not solderable.

DVDdoug: [u]40 AWG wire is rated for 90mA[/u] when used for "chassis wiring" (short wire runs).

I've run across Litz wire a few times when trying to replace a broken connector an a pre-made audio cable. It was nearly impossible to solder and I didn't know what kind of chemical you're supposed to use to "clean" it. I don't actually remember if I was successful...

As I recall, many years ago, MEK was the recommended solvent. Paul

Have you considered using 30 AWG Kynar wire wrap wire.


You can also get thin silicone insulated wire that is 30 AWG and has 11 strands.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/263738999323

herbschwarz: and thus is not solderable.

= Wrong, A. burn the enamel with cigarette lighter, dip the wire in soldering paste and and tin it , you may need to dip in soldering paste a few times.

B. Put the wire on aspirin pill (it is smell ) and and tin it, depemds to the pill, pill becone a liquid when is heated by soldering iron in that case hold the wire for short time (1 sec) and consider that liquid aspirin for enamel is like soldering paste for copper wire, some pils do not melts = better, just put wire on it and tin it. Warning !!! strong smell

old printer wire = stranded wire, they use 2 sizes, #22 or #24

old.jpg

I second the silicone wire, I have some and it's extremely flexible and quite strong.

Thanks, everyone. Lots to consider. I’m thinking of trying a couple different directions from above. I’ll try to find a place to get the Litz wire in a quantity that makes it relatively affordable. I only need about 30 feet or so.

tperry724: Thanks, everyone. Lots to consider. I'm thinking of trying a couple different directions from above. I'll try to find a place to get the Litz wire in a quantity that makes it relatively affordable. I only need about 30 feet or so.

WHY! it's only purpose, ever, was in RF work to keep the individual strands of the wire separated from each other. Paul

Hey Paul,

A big reason I'd like to try it is because of its apparent color and texture. It kinda looks "natural" like string or rope and this application is for a very detailed model ship where and hiding the wires that lead to LEDs to illuminate parts of the vessel is very important. Perhaps I should have mentioned that as well. BTW, I'm not the one building the ship, I wish I had that much talent.

Tony

And a round of karma on me! Thanks all.

tperry724: Hey Paul,

A big reason I'd like to try it is because of its apparent color and texture. It kinda looks "natural" like string or rope and this application is for a very detailed model ship where and hiding the wires that lead to LEDs to illuminate parts of the vessel is very important. Perhaps I should have mentioned that as well. BTW, I'm not the one building the ship, I wish I had that much talent.

Tony

For that, I would use solid magnet wire and paint it.

Could I use 40ga Litz wire to power one LED which draws 20mA? A best guess is welcome.

I guess one question is... how long is your wire going to be? It the total current draw 20mA or are there multiple LEDs.

Wire gauge is determined by two things:

1) how much voltage loss can be tolerated. 2) at high currents you have to consider the heat generated in the wire.

If I assume you are powering with 5V and your LED voltage drop at 20ma is 3V. Then you resistor is (5-3)/0.02 = 100 ohms.

In theory you could use a wire that is 100 ohms (very fine and very long) and eliminate the resistor. Or any combination of resistor and wire.

Consider #40 wire (single strand solid) for 10 feet, the resistance is only ~ 10.5 ohms. You could use this wire and a 90.9 ohm resistor in place of the 100 ohm resistor.

Hope this helps.

tperry724: Folks,

Anyone ever use Litz wire? I need a very thin and flexible wire.

Litz wire comes labeled as 40/44 or 105/40. I'm assuming the second number is the total gauge of all the individual strands. Is this correct?

Could I use 40ga Litz wire to power one LED which draws 20mA? A best guess is welcome.

Thank you.

Tony

I read your first post again. The first number is the number of strands, the second number is the AWG size of a single strand. Only applies to Litz wire. So, unless all strands are connected in parallel by soldering at the ends, the current limit is for a single #40 wire.

Paul

tperry724: Folks,

Anyone ever use Litz wire? I need a very thin and flexible wire.

Litz wire comes labeled as 40/44 or 105/40. I'm assuming the second number is the total gauge of all the individual strands. Is this correct?

Could I use 40ga Litz wire to power one LED which draws 20mA? A best guess is welcome.

Thank you.

Tony

Why not use bifilar ECW such as: https://www.wires.co.uk/acatalog/bb_wire.html