Logic State IP Transceiver

Hello everyone.

I don't know if I'm on the right section.

I did a search but I have not yet found anything that can do for me: I would need to remote 256 logical states in a site (constantly changing) in order to be able to view them remotely in a distant site in full duplex using 2 boards Arduino on LAN / IP network.
In other words it is like having a panel with 256 LEDs in a site (site n.1) and having the need to transmit the status of the LEDs (on / off) in site n.2 via LAN network, where I have a panel of LEDs that replicate the status of the LEDs of the panel of site n.1. Vice versa in the site n.2 I have another panel with another 256 LEDs to transmit the status to the site n.1, in the same way as in the previous example but in the opposite direction.

Could you give me a tip?

Thank You in advance

That would take a 32 byte packets (256/8) where each bit indicated one of the 256 status points. “Constantly changing” is a subjective term, that rate will determine if you can do it with the latency involved in your network. If you want to error check send the complement as an additional 8 bytes or a checksum, it is your choice. At this point I am assuming you know how to do the network side and write the appropriate software.

Ok. Thank you for your suggestion. I also have to choose the hardware necessary to bring the 256 parallel inputs to the Arduino inputs. I will try to take the path you showed me.

Unfortunately I am a beginner and I am very inexperienced in this matter. I hope to succeed.

p.s.: to be honest I thought it was not possible to make it happen because in the past someone discouraged me ....

The big problem here is not the matter of coding and transmission of data, but the mechanics of the 256 LEDs for which you wish to provide a "repeater".

How are they driven, what is the source of data they display and how do you propose to connect to that system? :astonished:

It is likely that what they display is already encoded somewhere in the system in a form which is more convenient to send and what you actually want is to intercept that. :sunglasses:

Yes, I've thought about it too, but unfortunately in my case they aren' t matrix but they are all parallel and independent outputs. In practice they are a little less than 256 but they all come from different devices. A small part are binary thumbwheels and in that case 10-16 different states are "mechanically encoded" in BCD, so in that case only 4 lines come out instead of 10 or 16 but otherwise the other lines to transmit are all separate and they have pure CMOS logical states with refer to ground (0V./5V.)

I don't know if they can be useful for the drafting of the circuit 8 of these 74LVC16245A and to go to Arduino inputs ...:

So you have a (large) number of apparently well-behaved CMOS (5 V) logic level sources with a common ground.

I don’t think a parallel bus transceiver is going to get you anywhere. Eight of these will - with some effort - reduce 128 inputs to sixteen but the Arduino is not well equipped to cope with 8 but parallel data, all the less so 16 bit.

You need shift registers - 74HC165 or similar - to roll all those bits efficiently into an Arduino.

Once you get the data to the other end I would (as usual) be recommending MAX7219 modules - four of them - to drive your 256 LED display. :sunglasses:

four of them

OP might need more than 4. Might be convenient to show the values of those tumbwheels as 7-segment displays, requiring an extra max7219.

Not too many arduino pins needed, though. Both the 74hc165 and max7219 can be daisy-chained and share the SPI pins and with the ethernet adaptor modules.

As for the type of Arduino, I've never used ethernet adaptors, what would other forum members recommend? Maybe Nano + Nano V3 ethernet "shield". At least it would be breadboard/stripboard compatible for prototyping.

PaulRB:
As for the type of Arduino, I’ve never used Ethernet adaptors, what would other forum members recommend?

I cautiously avoided that matter. :grinning: I have never been at all keen on using an Arduino for Ethernet and now we have the ESPs which are not only cheap but contain a very comprehensive stack implementing WiFi, they seem the “goto” for most applications. :sunglasses:

Of course you need the reliability of Ethernet for mission-critical and business applications, you might ask - is this one mission-critical?

Paul__B:
I cautiously avoided that matter. :grinning: I have never been at all keen on using an Arduino for Ethernet and now we have the ESPs which are not only cheap but contain a very comprehensive stack implementing WiFi, they seem the "goto" for most applications. :sunglasses:

Of course you need the reliability of Ethernet for mission-critical and business applications, you might ask - is this one mission-critical?

Yes, it is something that should have good reliability (like something professional). Let's say that as hardware I have no cost limits

frengo1:
Yes, it is something that should have good reliability (like something professional). Let's say that as hardware I have no cost limits

Well then, perhaps you should start with a Pi instead of an Arduino. :grinning:

Raspberry Pi? It seems excessive to me, it takes an OS.
But would this be necessary due to the matter Arduino is not powerful enough to handle the ehternet protocol?
At the limit I could also use a communication line in RS485 and put some LAN / RS485 converters but this would really complicate things.
This intrigues me and I would be tempted to try the various options .... >:(

Regarding the use of Arduino on LAN I have no intrusion problems because it is an intranet but I think that if in the future I had to send it on the Web I could do it through a hardware (physical) firewall. I think it might be enough....

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