Long distance data transmission

Hi,
I am planning to build a long range exploration rover with 2miles (3km) working range. The rover will include a pan/tilt camera, LED light, battery and a bunch of sensors (ultrasonic, temperature, RH, oxygen, explosive gas, etc).

I am searching for a wireless communication method which has 3km range and provides good data rate for streaming camera output and sensor data. I am thinking of using a long range Wifi router (like this) and a Raspberry Pi to transmit the camera stream. The Raspberry Pi will also act as a medium to connect an Arduino to Wifi network.

I appreciate any advice or ideas.
Thank you for your time.

The only option is a fast cell phone network. Wifi networks are line of sight only, and I doubt very much you would get the 2 km claimed in the link.

You need to be a aware of the vast differance there can be in range depending on the terrain, its a issue that affects most radio stuff, particularly at ground level.

You could build a systems that has a range of the 3km in flat open terrian, no buildings, trees, vegitation or the like in the way.

In an urban or wooded area the range could easily drop to 100M or less.

So what is the exploration environment ?

srnet:
So what is the exploration environment ?

The environment can vary but not in urban areas. It'll mostly be used in plain ground, forest, in a cave, etc. I guess the range will drop in a thick forest due to trees. What about a cave with large radius turns?

Thank you.

What about a cave with large radius turns?

Radio is nearly useless in a cave. Communications in Caves

theinlinaung2010:
The environment can vary but not in urban areas. It'll mostly be used in plain ground, forest, in a cave, etc. I guess the range will drop in a thick forest due to trees. What about a cave with large radius turns?

Thank you.

I would agree with jremington on the caves.

Range of WiFi in forests etc, may also be highly restricted.

Before you can decide on whether WiFi would work (3km in a forest ?) and I suspect it wont, you should carry out a test using WiFi gear in the actual environment intended.

As said before, caves are probably right out.

But for other terrains, get your Ham license so you can use a decent amount of power at 400 MHz or so.

KeithRB:
As said before, caves are probably right out.

But for other terrains, get your Ham license so you can use a decent amount of power at 400 MHz or so.

Whether a HAM license allows that rather depends on the country the OP is in.