Looking for a cheap lamp that emits light in the range of 200-1000nm

Hello,

I am currently looking for a cheap "lamp" that can emit light in the range of 200-1000nm (it should be bright enough, the brigthness of a 20mA red LED would be good). Right now I can only think of using a lamp (visible light source) that emits in the visible range of 400-700nm but I would like to reach 1000nm (IR) and even 200-400nm (UV). I was wondering if there is a cheap solution or do you think I will have to buy different diodes and glue them together? Thanks.

I think you can get UV led's - but at 200nm?....

you can get UV lamps eg for tanning - not sure what their wavelength is

a suitable xenon discharge lamp would give you lots - that's what UV spectrometers use .

regards

Allan

Nothing "cheap" will span that range. A deuterium lamp will produce significant power between 200 and 320 nm, but requires a special power supply.

LEDs exist only at one specific wavelenght (that's why a 'real' white LED doesn't exist, it's a blue LED with a phosphorous coating to create different wavelengths using fluorescence.)

Normal incandescent bulbs will emit a lot of IR and visible light. A xenon or krypton discharge lamp will emit quite a lot of UV light, but also extend into the visual and even infrared spectrum.

|500x320 |500x355

[...] the broadband spectrum, provides useable wavelengths from 160nm – 1000nm, making the xenon flashlamp a versatile light source for other application areas.

By altering the pulse shape, pulse duration, and current density its possible to maximize the output for many application areas. The envelope material can be customized to filter or enhance UV output, and can achieve the desired spectrum without harmful additives such as mercury or metal halides.

200nm is very far into the UV. That kind of light is almost not light at all. We certainly don't see any of that wavelength coming from the sun as it is filtered out by the atmosphere.

If you only want the brightness of an LED and don't mind a few gaps in the spectrum, then assembling a group of LEDs of different wavelengths would be best. Like an RGB LED simulates white with all three together, you need IRGBUUU (I don't know how many UV LEDs would be necessary.)

If you want a continuous spectrum then you are looking at thousands of dollars in filters and other equipment to shape the spectrum how you want. Have a look at Edmunds Scientific. I bet they have a (pricey) solution to your problem.

paigioph: Hello,

I am currently looking for a cheap "lamp" that can emit light in the range of 200-1000nm (it should be bright enough, the brigthness of a 20mA red LED would be good). Right now I can only think of using a lamp (visible light source) that emits in the visible range of 400-700nm but I would like to reach 1000nm (IR) and even 200-400nm (UV). I was wondering if there is a cheap solution or do you think I will have to buy different diodes and glue them together? Thanks.

A regular incandescent lamp will emit from 365 to over 1000 nm. The sun emits from 250 up.

re UV LED's - I was being silly .. 200nm implies a bandgap of >7V ( Planck) I don't think any semiconductor junction has a gap that high!

regards

Allan

ChrisTenone: A regular incandescent lamp will emit from 365 to over 1000 nm. The sun emits from 250 up.

Tungsten lighting has very little power in lower wavelengths - the blue violet end just tails right off since you'd need a black body radiator at 6000K to match the sun's spectrum. Arc lamp will do it, not cheap: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Xenon_arc_lamp - though many such bulbs for projectors may incorporate UV and IR filtering into the glass itself, as usual read the datasheets...

I'd also have a look at 'art-gallery' white LED lamps, these have a much better spectrum than cheap white LEDs, but will filter out all the UV which damages display items.

BTW 200nm needs special care since it is well beyond the UVB range and probably much more tanning and cancer-causing. You will need eye protection (cataracts) and preferably avoid all skin exposure (skin cancer and radiation burns).

Why do you want this range?

Hi, What is the application that requires a light with that spectrum?

Tom... :)

MarkT:
Tungsten lighting has very little power in lower wavelengths - the blue violet end just tails right off
since you’d need a black body radiator at 6000K to match the sun’s spectrum. Arc lamp will do it,
not cheap: Xenon arc lamp - Wikipedia - though many such bulbs for projectors may incorporate UV and IR
filtering into the glass itself, as usual read the datasheets…

I’d also have a look at ‘art-gallery’ white LED lamps, these have a much better spectrum than
cheap white LEDs, but will filter out all the UV which damages display items.

BTW 200nm needs special care since it is well beyond the UVB range and probably much more
tanning and cancer-causing. You will need eye protection (cataracts) and preferably avoid all
skin exposure (skin cancer and radiation burns).

Why do you want this range?

Incandescents have very low output in UV, even blue, but present. The OP did not state a power requirement.