Looking for a simple schematic to control a few lights

I am looking for a simple schematic for a way to control multiple lights with a single switch.

I want to be able to turn on light switch and have a light come on. Simple so far.

I then want to be able to turn the switch off and back on within a second or two and the light goes off but a different light comes on. Turn the switch off and back on again and both lights come on.

If I can get it to work with LEDs then stepping up to incandescent shouldn’t be a problem. It seems I should be able to do this with some CMOS inverters or gates and a few resistors and caps.

Why?? Can`t you just write a simple arduino program?

Sounds like you have the idea, now buy yourself an Arduino, some 330Ohm Resitors and some LEDs and experiment. Should be able to do it for $45 or less. When you can do it with LEDs then you can ask about how to do it with 120VAC lights.

I would like to do it for 1 to 2 dollars not 45 dollars.

I also don't want to install a CNC machine to slice my bread. Using an Arduino for this purpose is serious over kill.

How do you turn on/off a switch?

Easy- each light with its switch...You will probably even have spare change if you recycle some switches and all !!

I want to be able to turn on light switch and have a light come on. Simple so far.

I then want to be able to turn the switch off and back on within a second or two and the light goes off but a different light comes on. Turn the switch off and back on again and both lights come on.

I would like to do it for 1 to 2 dollars not 45 dollars.

Yes! That's a binary counter:

00 = 0 decimal 01 = 1 decimal 10 = 2 decimal 11 = 3 decimal[/b]

An example of a binary counter is the [u]74LS93[/u].

If you want to stop at decimal 3 and start-over, you'd typically feed the 3rd output (bit 2) into the chip's clear or reset pin, so that when it counts to 100, it gets reset back to 000. Or in this case, you can just ignore the unused outputs and allow the two least significant bits to "loop" between 00 an 11.

You'll also need to de-bounce your mechanical switch. You might be able to use a capacitor, or maybe schmitt triger chip, or maybe a flip-flop (I've forgotten exactly how to debounce a switch).

I understand the problems with debounce and such. And yes, some sort of an RC timing circuit would be in order.

The idea is that I would not have the power on all the time. If I turn the switch off, all the lights go off. The switch is not a source of clock pulses applied to a circuit that is constantly powered.

The idea is to place this in an existing light fixture and use existing wiring and switches.