Loop Back Test - Sticky?

You need a PC program to communicate over the serial line.
These programs are called terminal programs (or application).

Older Windows versions came with hyperterminal.
But there’s a lot of these applications around, and each has its own advantages and disadvantages.

HOW DO YOU GET THE SERIAL MONITOR?

Hi and welcome.

Certainly not by SHOUTING at it, that's just rude.

Open the Arduino IDE. On the right , just above the edit screen you'll see an icon. If you hover over it, a text will appear telling you that that is a way to open the serial monitor (click it). You can also go to the menu, tools and select serial monitor from there. Or press ctrl+shift+m . Plenty of ways to get there i'd say (this is all valid for the windows version of the IDE, i don't know about other versions but i suspect some of the above mentioned will be very similar).

Working serial connection between Arduino serial port and PC is demonstrated by flashing of both RX and TX LEDs during ANY program "Upload".

The physical RX path can also be verified by using and running Examples Basic BareMinimum and monitor.

Just type in random series of characters - using PC keyboard "repeat" feature and than pres "Send" or just key in "Enter".

Flashing "RX" LED indicates good RX connection and is a good indicator that TX works also. Setting the baud rate to 300 bauds makes the RX flashing more pronounced during this simple verification test.

Software remote loopback test (monitor as a source and Arduino as a remote destination) can be implemented by echoing ( using Serial ) the characters typed into monitor "send" field back to the monitor "print" field. Observing both LED's will verify the connection.

Software remote test "sketch" available upon request.

So my Arduino Uno R3 board failed the test and will not execute the program that used to be on it, and does not allow me to upload any new program; returns "avrdude: stk500_recv(): programmer is not responding". The "ON" light is on and the "L" LED stays solid on all of the time. Correct voltage comes out of the 5V pin. Does this mean that the processor is dead and I should buy a new board? Not sure what the next test I should run is.

Hi and welcome.

The loopback test doesn't test the controller ("processor"), it tests the USB to serial converter without any interaction of that controller. That's why you need to keep the reset active during the test.

So if you do the loopback test and it fails, you can assume the USB to serial converter chip is dead. It doesn't tell you anything about the controller (so that also means it could still have died during the event causing this). There's other ways to program the controller, but that's a bit more advanced and you need something to replace the USB to serial converter (perhaps another Arduino board). Or ultimately use an external programmer.

can’t do this test if the computer can’t talk to the uno.

could you please show which port should i connect the jumpers on a arduino mega 2560?

I assume instead of "port" you mean "pin". In which case you will need to make two connections. The complete instructions are here... http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=73748.0

D0 & D1.

Good write up... thanks for the details

New to Arduino and programming first time user so the direction

  1. Start your favourite terminal application. Serial Monitor will work fine.

does not tell me what I should do as I do not have a favourite Terminal application and don't know what Serial Monitor is.

I am sorry to hear you are struggling with Google. This should help... https://www.google.com/search?q=arduino+serial+monitor

Thanks for the whole process, but I'm currently stuck at step nr. 7. I don't really understand, what do you mean by "Connect the terminal application to the serial port for your board."

How are we supposed to do that?

Untitled.png

Hmm, that's it? Okay, got connected. But still, wasn't able to do anything actually.

Considering changing 1. Atmel and then 2. FTDI.

If you see your typed texts in terminal, you do not need to change the FTDI. That's what this thread is all about: figuring out whether your USB/serial chip (for you FTDI) works or not. If you do not see anything, suspect FTDI and anything it depends on (assuming you did all steps correctly). The latter doesn't mean Atmel is OK.

As a novice to Arduino I have the following questions regarding:

< Loop-Back Test Instructions >

QUESTION
" 6. Start your favourite terminal application. Serial Monitor will work fine."

Q1:does (6) mean: Clk on Serial Monitor icon top, right hand edge of Arduino IDE screen?

"7. Connect the terminal application to the serial port for your board.

Q2:does (7) mean: perform the procedure described in (8)“Send data…” ;
the data should be echoed back to the Serial Monitor from the Arduino UNO

marty
email: hawkeye@013net.net

Do not cross-post. Other thread removed.

martymarty:
Q1:does (6) mean: Clk on Serial Monitor icon top, right hand edge of Arduino IDE screen?

Yes.

Q2:does (7) mean: perform the procedure described in (8)“Send data…” ;
the data should be echoed back to the Serial Monitor from the Arduino UNO

No. When using Serial Monitor you have to select the serial port before opening Serial Monitor. In the IDE click Tools then Port then the serial port associated with your board.