Low Line Oxygen Pressure Alarm - Project Feasability

I work for a pharmaceutical laboratory and was wondering what the feasibility would be for using an Arduino as an alarm for when our low line oxygen pressure for our oxygen cylinders drop below a certain threshold. As you can imagine, the oxygen level is very important when you're trying to grow cells. I would need a pressure sensor that could handle small pressures in the range of 0-25 PSI (the gauge typically sits around 22 PSI and I would like it to detect when it drops to 10 PSI or below). Once the pressure sensor reads low, I would like it to trigger either an audio or visual alarm and then send out a text/email to let us know. Any sort of guidance or suggestions would be greatly appreciated

Also, I am sort of new to Arduino, just trying to come up with some ideas for my boss so I apologize if its a dumb idea :).

Thanks in advance!

if you can find a suitable sensor with digital output, and a plumber to install it in the appropriate position in the system, and you can learn to program the arduino to read and decode the sensor output protocol, and can acquire a internet interface shield, and learn how to program that, while servicing the pressure sensor, and send your e-mail,, firing off the audible or visual alarm is child's play.

So, yes, it could work,,, really good application idea.

suggestion? "Google is your friend."

I am thinking a 60 PSI transducer will work as the "gas sensor". I can send the output (voltage varies linerally based on the gas pressure) to the arduino and then have that output to a small LCD screen hooked up to some kind of buzzer or light based alarm. I am thinking the MKR1000 board will work well since you can connect it to wifi and code it to send out an email once the gas pressure reaches a certain level.

Domestic premises that use bottled propane gas eg for cooking often have a mechanical automatic changeover valve to swap from a first to a second bottle when the first runs out.. could such a gadget be useful?

regards

Allan.

udflyer4life:
I work for a pharmaceutical laboratory and was wondering what the feasibility would be for using an Arduino as an alarm for when our low line oxygen pressure for our oxygen cylinders drop below a certain threshold. As you can imagine, the oxygen level is very important when you're trying to grow cells. I would need a pressure sensor that could handle small pressures in the range of 0-25 PSI (the gauge typically sits around 22 PSI and I would like it to detect when it drops to 10 PSI or below). Once the pressure sensor reads low, I would like it to trigger either an audio or visual alarm and then send out a text/email to let us know. Any sort of guidance or suggestions would be greatly appreciated

Also, I am sort of new to Arduino, just trying to come up with some ideas for my boss so I apologize if its a dumb idea :).

Thanks in advance!

Should not be much of a problem, As long as your pressure sensor can handle pure oxygen at the target pressure.

If it is mission critical, I would connect two oxygen sources, with the each one having a regulator. The primary source would have it's output set to 25psi, the backup to 22psi.

The Arduino would output messages:

  • "On Primary" Periodically, when pressure is greater than 24psi.
  • "PRIMARY Failed" Periodically when pressure is below 24psi.
  • "On Secondary" Periodically when pressure is below 23psi.
  • "Critical Faliure" Continously when pressure below 22psi.

Chuck.

udflyer4life:
Also, I am sort of new to Arduino, just trying to come up with some ideas for my boss so I apologize if its a dumb idea :).

Thanks in advance!

Not a dumb idea if it is useful.

Pressure sensors can be had easily at a price, using an arduino as you describe is feasible.
The only problem is likely to be the sensor.
Some here have tried to come up with non invasive means to measure utility meters.
So perhaps you could do the same with your gauge.

The main problem is a direct connection, leccy board don't permit it and given the regs relating to pressurised gasses in the workplace installing the sensor by a suitably qualified person is likely to be costly.

I thought that pharma companies had loads of dosh - enough to get a man to screw a sensor in a pipe, anyway !

regards

Allan.

:slight_smile:

I know little about them operationally although reps i knew had a pretty good lifestyle.

A diving club i belonged to years ago had one of their members retire and loose his accreditation.
He was the one who maintained the recharging bottle banks.

Paying someone to do it was out of our pockets and buying air became very expensive after that.

allanhurst:
I thought that pharma companies had loads of dosh - enough to get a man to screw a sensor in a pipe, anyway !

regards

Allan.

Haha well regardless of how much money they have (which yes is a lot), a business is still a business so it will save money wherever it can. With that being said, we do have the oxygen setup to a secondary tank line as well and we have a pressure regulator gauge on it already. The main concern for lack of pressure is when there is a loss of power. The power supply in this building suite is known to have glitches and goes off and back on more than it should.

With that being said, I was thinking that I could attach a pressure transducer after the regulator (would be as simple as putting together pipes) which will give off a voltage signal that I can decode with the arduino and then output it to a 16x2 LCD screen.

Thanks for the support guys. My friend and I are going to attempt this project so I will let you know how it turns out!

Hi,

The very important key here is to get the correct pressure sensor.

There are specific conditions to be met when using oxygen, and valves and sensors have to be approved for use in an oxygen environment.

Tom..... :slight_smile:

If you're worried about power glitches and this is important, you could always fit an uninterruptable power supply such as critical computer users have. It doesn't sound as if your electronics will use much power so it needn't be a big one.

regards

Allan.