Maintaining 2 DC motors at seperate fixed rpm via PWM

Right off the bat I want to let you all know that I am very much new to this so only some of what I've read through has made sense.

As the subject line says I'm looking to drive 2 seperate DC motors at different rpms but the hitch is I straight up don't know which board is most effective to achieve this... I've done my best to research before looking like a fool and posting but here I am.

Suggestions on board and why are very much appreciated along with whether I'll need a shield and/or a breadboard to achieve the afore mentioned objective.
THANK YOU ALL VERY MUCH!!!

My power source is a 5v DC 1,000mA USB powerbank with 4,000mA capacity...? The motors I'm looking at are both DC 3v-6v and I'll be directing power through 1 slip ring connector for sure but maybe a second for return current if appropriate (I don't have an electrical background)

Why do you think that you need slip rings for powering DC motors? DC motors include brushes for contact to the rotating coils.

If you want to run the motors in one direction only, you need a transistor for driving each motor. If both directions are desired, use H-bridges. Both are readily available modules or shields.

Each motor requires a rotational encoder and a PID regulator for stabilizing the speed. See the many examples how to implement and configure such a project. No special Arduino is required, it only has to support 4 inputs (for the encoders) and 2 PWM outputs.

I figure I'll need a slip ring (or two) given that I'll be running current across a spool that ought to be able to rotate as needed and I don't want to twist the wire into oblivion, similar concept to the retractable air lines on a spool you see in a workshop.

the slip ring(s) is only going to have power for one motor transmitted through it and is by no means going to be spun by a motor

Zan5505:
The motors I'm looking at are both DC 3v-6v and I'll be directing power through 1 slip ring connector for sure but maybe a second for return current if appropriate

I don't understand that. Can you draw a simple diagram to illustrate what you have in mind and upload the image. See this Simple Image Guide

If you need to make the motors run at a specific speed in the face of a varying load then you need some means for the Arduino to measure the speed of the motor and adjust the power to keep the speed constant. In my experience a simple detector that produces one pulse per revolution is sufficient. That could be an optical detector or a magnet hall-effect detector. Allied to that you will need PID code (probably only the PI part) to enable the Arduino to match the power to the speed without over- or under-shooting.

...R

Robin2:
I don’t understand that. Can you draw a simple diagram to illustrate what you have in mind and upload the image.

as I said initially in my first post I have little to non-existent electrical background so drawing you a circuit will take me a little more time

Robin2:
If you need to make the motors run at a specific speed in the face of a varying load then you need some means for the Arduino to measure the speed of the motor and adjust the power to keep the speed constant.

the load on the motors will remain the same as the object that each will be affecting will not be changing in mass nor will the gear ratio be modified over time.

the prop in question being built is called an “Atterax” (picture below) from the game “Warframe” it is a retractable whip with a counter rotating head

I want to stress that THIS IS A PROP WEAPON I’M BUILDING FOR PHOTO AND VIDEO SHOOTS ONLY

GrineerWhip.png

Zan5505:
as I said initially in my first post I have little to non-existent electrical background so drawing you a circuit will take me a little more time

I did not mean an electrical circuit. I am hoping you will post a diagram (or drawing) of the project you are trying to create that will explain why you propose to use a slip ring.

the load on the motors will remain the same as the object that each will be affecting will not be changing in mass nor will the gear ratio be modified over time.

In that case you may be able to figure out the appropriate value for analogWrite() by trial and error and there may be no need for measuring the speed of the motor. But you will need to experiment to see if that simple system is sufficient.

…R

I think my original post may have been too long winded or convoluted...

my only question here is which Arduino board do I need and/or will I need a breadboard?

Any Arduino should be suitable. An Uno is the best board for a beginner because most programs and most add-ons work with it.

I don't know what you have in mind when you ask about a breadboard.

I presume you have read Reply #1

...R