Making a potentiometer easier to move.

Hello. I'm making a project where I'm detecting the rotation of an arm using a potentiometer. How do i make the potentiometer easier to move. When I'm physically rotating the potentiometer there is some resistance( it requires more force to rotate the potentiometer than I would like to). I'm using a 10k potentiometer: link to potentiometer. Is there any way to oil the potentiometer or something so it moves easier?

shimonchick: Is there any way to oil the potentiometer or something so it moves easier?

*Assuming * a carbon element, a good part of the mechanical resistance is from the wiper pressing against the element, you can't get away from that. Put oil on that and you'll ruin it. A pot with a plastic element might turn easier.

There's thi$. If you want to pore over spec sheets you might find one with a low enough torque number. Or, consider an encoder.

YMMV

Hello. I want to track the rotation of each joint of a finger/arm. I need a (reasonably) small potentiometer or some other sensor that has low torque. I saw that there are some rotary encoders with low torque, but I don't need to track multiple laps, so I don't want to have to connect so many pins because I will be using many of the sensors. Are there any small low torque potentiometers with reasonable price? Thank you.

Hello. I want to track the rotation of each joint of a finger/arm. I need a (reasonably) small potentiometer or some other sensor that has low torque. I saw that there are some rotary encoders with low torque, but I don't need to track multiple laps, so I don't want to have to connect so many pins because I will be using many of the sensors. Are there any alternatives or are there any small low torque potentiometers with reasonable price? Thank you.

Yes. Check with component suppliers. The big ones will have links to datasheets that state the required torque and some, like Digikey, have functions for searching tables of device characteristics.

Or just google "low torque potentiometer".

Hello. I want to track the rotation of each joint of a finger/arm. I need to buy or make a (reasonably) small potentiometer or some other sensor that has low torque. I saw that there are some rotary encoders with low torque, but I don't need to track multiple laps, so I don't want to have to connect so many pins because I will be using many of the sensors and don't want to have to deal with so many cables. Are there any small low torque potentiometers with reasonable price? Or how can i make myself one? I have a 3D printer so if i need any specific plastic parts this would be no problem. Any suggestions? Thank you.

Please, one thread per topic.

Reported to moderators for cross posting.

@shimonchick, do not cross-post. Threads merged. Again. And again.

The shaft of a pot, where it goes through the threaded bush, contains a silicone grease that slows down fast movements, so you can control it with some mechanical smoothness. No way to undo this unless you open the pot and wash away the grease. Leo..

There are expensive non contact hall effect potentiometers where the only friction is due to the shaft bearings.

You should try to turn it into T-shaped handle then it will require less force to turn. In fact make it L-shaped and as long the handle will be, as smaller will be the force, fulcrum type concept. You can Simulate your Electronics Project in Proteus.

Oiling a potentiometer/rheostat is a bad idea becuse it attracts dirt and eventually it evaporates...

The correct answer for what you want to do is gearing. Put a big gear on the potentiometer and drive it with a little gear.

if you have a space issue, you can use nylon cable to move the gears.

An optical or hall-effect rotary encoder is the way go, they won't wear out like a pot either (cheap pots have a surprising short lifetime if constantly moved)