Making a project open source

Hi guys,

I don't know if this is the right board to post this but I'll post anyway.

I have a project that I have been working on and I wish to publish it as open source hardware.

What creative common licenses etc or other stuff do I need to include or have in order to make my project open source?

Also is there somewhere I can store documentation etc related to my project, such as an open source hardware database etc?

Sorry if this question sounds stupid, I'm kinda new to all of this!

Thanks for any help,

Peter

First off read:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_source and then get over to :- http://www.opensource.org/

But basically publish it anywhere you can and put a note in the files saying this is open source.

Grumpy_Mike: First off read:- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_source and then get over to :- http://www.opensource.org/

But basically publish it anywhere you can and put a note in the files saying this is open source.

Thanks, I'll do that now. Not as confusing as I thought it would be!

Perhaps a way forward in your project is by using creative Commons license. It gives you the freedom of choosing a more specific licensing baseline for you project.

Yes but then it would not be open source but restrictive in some way.

Agree, the least restrictive is to give credit to the original author (BY), the most restrictive is no derivatives, no commercial use. So the choice is there without the possibility of fully open, ie. no recognition.

If there anyway I can change the license once published?

Maybe with feedback I can pick the right license in the end.

Yes, you can change it afterwards.

If it helps, I am licensing my open source work as: CC BY-SA.

Creative commons, attribution, share alike any derivative work.

If there anyway I can change the license once published?

I think you can only do it one way. For example if you release it as open source, you can't then restrict it's use later if the open source files have been downloaded and in use. They can always be re posted.

However what ever license you use it only protects you providing you are willing to stump up and defend your license in court. If some one very big and corporate wants to steal you stuff they will. It's like bidding at a poker game, they just raise you more than you have.

Grumpy_Mike:

If there anyway I can change the license once published?

I think you can only do it one way. For example if you release it as open source, you can't then restrict it's use later if the open source files have been downloaded and in use. They can always be re posted.

However what ever license you use it only protects you providing you are willing to stump up and defend your license in court. If some one very big and corporate wants to steal you stuff they will. It's like bidding at a poker game, they just raise you more than you have.

Well, yes and no. The copyright holder can release later versions under different licenses. There are cases of dual-licensed software as well. As far as defending against infringement, it isn't always a matter of having to go it alone. For example, the Software Freedom Law Center can help. I think there are other legal defense funds out there though a quick search didn't turn up what I was looking for. Not sure what exists for the hardware side of things.