Making an arduino wall power supply?

So how would I go about making a power supply for the arduino that connects to the wall?

Really?

You don’t just want to buy one of these?

http://www.mpja.com/prodinfo.asp?number=18469+PS


The Arduino Drum Machine: MIDI development system with 14-track MIDI drum machine sequencer / groove-box software

RuggedCircuits: Really?

You don't just want to buy one of these?

http://www.mpja.com/prodinfo.asp?number=18469+PS

-- The Arduino Drum Machine: MIDI development system with 14-track MIDI drum machine sequencer / groove-box software

no, cause then what will I learn?

OK....then build this :)

http://www.onsemi.com/pub_link/Collateral/TND330-D.PDF

A more traditional (and much simpler) design involves a transformer, rectifier, and filter. Maybe start here?

http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/samschem.htm#schlpi

-- The Gadget Shield: accelerometer, RGB LED, IR transmit/receive, speaker, microphone, light sensor, potentiometer, pushbuttons

polishdude20:

RuggedCircuits: Really?

You don't just want to buy one of these?

http://www.mpja.com/prodinfo.asp?number=18469+PS

-- The Arduino Drum Machine: MIDI development system with 14-track MIDI drum machine sequencer / groove-box software

no, cause then what will I learn?

We all applaud learning opportunities. However because such a power supply has to wire to 120 or 220 vac outlet power, it's not a real safe candidate projects for those inexperienced with electrical safety requirements. Most small wall wart power modules are well insulated and have various approval ratings for safe operation. I would recommend you limit your learning experience to projects that only use DC voltages up to 24vdc or less.

Lefty

retrolefty:

polishdude20:

RuggedCircuits: Really?

You don't just want to buy one of these?

http://www.mpja.com/prodinfo.asp?number=18469+PS

-- The Arduino Drum Machine: MIDI development system with 14-track MIDI drum machine sequencer / groove-box software

no, cause then what will I learn?

We all applaud learning opportunities. However because such a power supply has to wire to 120 or 220 vac outlet power, it's not a real safe candidate projects for those inexperienced with electrical safety requirements. Most small wall wart power modules are well insulated and have various approval ratings for safe operation. I would recommend you limit your learning experience to projects that only use DC voltages up to 24vdc or less.

Lefty

ha! you know I'm not gonna take your word for it right? I'm pretty confident in my safety, I'm not some stupid kid.

RuggedCircuits: OK....then build this :)

http://www.onsemi.com/pub_link/Collateral/TND330-D.PDF

A more traditional (and much simpler) design involves a transformer, rectifier, and filter. Maybe start here?

http://www.repairfaq.org/sam/samschem.htm#schlpi

-- The Gadget Shield: accelerometer, RGB LED, IR transmit/receive, speaker, microphone, light sensor, potentiometer, pushbuttons

wait a second! I found my old Dlink router wall adapter and its rated output is 5v 2.5 amps. WOuld the 2.5 amps matter for the arduino? if so then what can I do to lower the current?

ha! you know I’m not gonna take your word for it right? I’m pretty confident in my safety, I’m not some stupid kid.

LOL I was once. I was sticking wires into power outlets at the tender age of 10. I though I could make a great electromagnet by winding ten turns of number 12 gauge wire around a large nail and stuck the wire ends into the plug, lots of smoke, small flame, blister on fingers. I had to then quickly find out how to change a screw in fuse on the service panel before my folks found out, luckly there were a few spare fuses on top of the panel.

Have fun, do be safe and let us know what you come up with.

Lefty

retrolefty:

ha! you know I'm not gonna take your word for it right? I'm pretty confident in my safety, I'm not some stupid kid.

LOL I was once. I was sticking wires into power outlets at the tender age of 10. I though I could make a great electromagnet by winding ten turns of number 12 gauge wire around a large nail and stuck the wire ends into the plug, lots of smoke, small flame, blister on fingers. I had to then quickly find out how to change a screw in fuse on the service panel before my folks found out, luckly there were a few spare fuses on top of the panel.

Have fun, do be safe and let us know what you come up with.

Lefty

lol! well thanks for nto being all grown u on me and stuff but yeah I'm 17 so I think i've learned enough to know how to handle a wall outlet, but ye I tried my dlink adapter 5v 2.5A and it works to blink an LED but not my LCD

dlink adapter 5v 2.5A and it works to blink an LED but not my LCD

I would think 2.5 amps would be more then enough for a LCD? Are you sure there is not some other problem? Got a link to the LCD?

Lefty

With all my respect to the author of this post, and participants, especially: RuggedCircuits it's not a compliment, he give an answer. And I think good answer. So what is all about? A power suply or ardino + power suply? just buy one (power supply) on a market, because in IMHO it will cost more to buid one.

Magician: With all my respect to the author of this post, and participants, especially: RuggedCircuits it's not a compliment, he give an answer. And I think good answer. So what is all about? A power suply or ardino + power suply? just buy one (power supply) on a market, because in IMHO it will cost more to buid one.

well actually It is free to build one for me possibly because in my electronics class we have tons of parts and the teacher usually lets us use them for free. And also to the other guy my answer is that I think since it's 5 volts that it's not working. I read that the arduino needs at least around 6-9 volts externally so it can lower the voltage down to 5. But with it already at 5 it wont work.

If you really want to build one, here are classic linear regulator designs, I built many of these for my digital and analog projects over the years. TO-220 style with heat sink for small loads, the bigger pancake style screwed to chassis (with mica insulator) for higher currents.

(unable to upload files, error message saying upload file are is full ?? reported to admin)

Yes, CrossRoads is right, the simplest power supply. It could be even simplier if no 7805 chips in, as arduino has chip on a board : MC33269D . So what is your budget, have more money I can provide you details how to build switching power supply unit, high grade, military special requirement, you can launch it on a rocket:

temp - -40 - 150C vibration - more than 20g x-ray resistive;

Or you ca buy Chinese one for 2$ :)

polishdude20:
ha! you know I’m not gonna take your word for it right? I’m pretty confident in my safety, I’m not some stupid kid.

…then…

polishdude20:
lol! well thanks for nto being all grown u on me and stuff but yeah I’m 17 so I think i’ve learned enough to know how to handle a wall outlet, but ye I tried my dlink adapter 5v 2.5A and it works to blink an LED but not my LCD

/emphasis mine/

Listen - not meaning any disrespect here; I’m double your age and then some, but I remember what I was like when I was 17 - I was a “stupid kid”. This isn’t to say I was ignorant, nor is it to say I didn’t know anything or have any reasoning skills. What I want to convey is that someday, you’re going to look back on being 17 and say to yourself “damn, maybe I didn’t know everything after all” - and perhaps on thinking that you’ll remember these comments.

Mains power isn’t something to casually mess with; most adults don’t even understand the difference between neutral and ground. One wrong move and you might find yourself in the hospital, or possibly the morgue.

The fact that you think you must somehow lower the current output of a power supply tells me you are no where near ready to tackle a mains powered power supply. Get some more knowledge under you belt, then return to the idea.

/stay safe…

:slight_smile:

cr0sh:

polishdude20: ha! you know I'm not gonna take your word for it right? I'm pretty confident in my safety, I'm not some stupid kid.

...then...

polishdude20: lol! well thanks for nto being all grown u on me and stuff but yeah I'm 17 so I think i've learned enough to know how to handle a wall outlet, but ye I tried my dlink adapter 5v 2.5A and it works to blink an LED but not my LCD

/emphasis mine/

Listen - not meaning any disrespect here; I'm double your age and then some, but I remember what I was like when I was 17 - I was a "stupid kid". This isn't to say I was ignorant, nor is it to say I didn't know anything or have any reasoning skills. What I want to convey is that someday, you're going to look back on being 17 and say to yourself "damn, maybe I didn't know everything after all" - and perhaps on thinking that you'll remember these comments.

Mains power isn't something to casually mess with; most adults don't even understand the difference between neutral and ground. One wrong move and you might find yourself in the hospital, or possibly the morgue.

The fact that you think you must somehow lower the current output of a power supply tells me you are no where near ready to tackle a mains powered power supply. Get some more knowledge under you belt, then return to the idea.

/stay safe...

:)

... sigh this is what I have to deal with on these forums. People who misunderstand what I have said. I meant that I am safe enough NOT to touch things that will get me killed. I also meant that I can follow instructions and advice very accurately which will help me not mess around with things I might get hurt with. Yes, mains power is not something to play with but it's not like I will be touching any of the wires or terminals. Lastly, safety is actually the most basic thing you must know before any of the other parts of electronics. Obviously I didn't know about the current thing you said but that is AFTER safety. I realize you guys here are much older than me and that is why I come here for advice. So I ask of you not to judge my safety abilities by my electronics knowledge because safety comes first.

dlink adapter 5v 2.5A and it works to blink an LED but not my LCD

Are you feeding it into the Vin barrel connector, or in via the +5V line on USB connector or "power" pins? If it's really 5V (and this is likely for a 2.5A adapter from a modern router), you want to do the latter, because the regulator/input circuitry from the barrel socket will drop 1V or more...

My general advice for Arduino power adapters is that you should find or buy one of the many cute little "USB charger" adapters (eg for iphone) and use them to power your arduino using a USB cable through the USB connector. Second choice (or if you need the higher Vin voltage) is to look in a thrift store for an adapter that has be orphaned from an older phone, video game, or other device, that provides about 8 to 10V at 300mA or so.

If you're set on building something, there are kits that are probably a good starting point (like http://www.goldmine-elec-products.com/prodinfo.asp?number=C6724 ) It used to be that you could throw something together with the 6.3V filament transformers that were easy to harvest from tube-based throw-aways, but those are a bit hard to find, so you'd be buying most of the components anyway...

Knowing what you're doing with the AC side of a power supply is more than just knowing not to stick your fingers in the outlet. OTOH, it doesn't take a master's degree in Science to do it either; building a traditional transformer based supply is probably safer than fishing your english muffin out of the toaster.

okay guys everything is fine now, I found a wall wart with the right specs for the arduino and all's good