Max current rating and possible damages

Hey. The current rating for DUE's I/O lines is a max of 130mA. I'm wondering if the following would damage the DUE or not:

Have pin at 3.3V connected to ground through a resistor of say 10 ohm.

This would require 330mA from that pin. What would happen? Would this damage the board, would the voltage on the pin drop so that 130mA pass through the resistor, or would something different happen?

Thanks.

goncalor: Hey. The current rating for DUE's I/O lines is a max of 130mA. I'm wondering if the following would damage the DUE or not:

Have pin at 3.3V connected to ground through a rististor of say 10 ohm.

This would require 330mA from that pin. What would happen? Would this damage the board, would the voltage on the pin drop so that 130mA pass through the resistor, or would something different happen?

Thanks.

That 130 ma specification is for total sum of all I/O pin, not a single pin. Drawing more current from an output pin will lower the voltage output of the pin but also likely to damage the pin. Stay within recommended value.

Here is some info on I/O pins from the Due product page:

Digital I/O: pins from 0 to 53 Each of the 54 digital pins on the Due can be used as an input or output, using pinMode(), digitalWrite(), and digitalRead() functions. They operate at 3.3 volts. Each pin can provide (source) a current of 3 mA or 15 mA, depending on the pin, or receive (sink) a current of 6 mA or 9 mA, depending on the pin. They also have an internal pull-up resistor (disconnected by default) of 100 KOhm. In addition, some pins have specialized functions:

Oh, the 130mA is the sum of all I/O pins. That's a little different a current.

Thank you for your reply, retrolefty.

What would happen?

Poof.


Rob

The individual pin limits depend on the pin and range from 3mA to 15mA (source), 6ma to 9mA (sink). If in doubt only connect pins to other logic devices...