Maximum Current Draw from Arduino Mega

Hi, I have an arduino uno and I know that its maximum current per pin is 40mA, and the sum of the current can not exceed 200mA. I recently bought a arduino mega and I know that its maximum current per pin is still 40mA, but I do not know what sum of the maximum current I can use. Does anyone know this information? Sorry for my bad english.

According to the ATmega2560 datasheet, it also has a max of 200mA on the VCC and GND pins (which I believe is where that limit comes from in the first place)

Capelinha:
Hi, I have an arduino uno and I know that its maximum current per pin is 40mA, and the sum of the current can not exceed 200mA. I recently bought a arduino mega and I know that its maximum current per pin is still 40mA, but I do not know what sum of the maximum current I can use. Does anyone know this information? Sorry for my bad english.

That is not quite correct. 40mA is the “absolute maximum”. The manufacturer does not recommend drawing that much current from a pin under normal circumstances:

“This is a stress rating only and
functional operation of the device at these or
other conditions beyond those indicated in the
operational sections of this specification is not
implied. Exposure to absolute maximum rating
conditions for extended periods may affect
device reliability.”

Mega can handle 200mA PER VCC or Gnd pin, so 800 mA total.
I have posted an e-mail from Atmel Tech Support documenting this in the past.

One must still not exceed the per-port current limits documented in the datasheet.

FOR EVERYONE
A microprocessor is not a power supply.

It is very bad design practice to draw anything greater than the trigger/stimulus current from an I/O pin
(In that case this is a legitimate question, but rarely relevant in hobby style projects if 'proper' design metrics are used.)

Using the 5V and 3.3V pins is also 'risky', because as stated above, a micro-controller board is not a power supply!

Plan & Design your solution before you wire it up.
Cooked regulators, tracks or I/O pins are entirely up to you.