meassuring temperature of flowing liquid in a pc water cooling project

Dear arduino community,
i‘ld like to start learning arduino by doing a concrete (simple) project. I’ld like to measure the temperature in my water cooling loop of my pc and decide, based on the current temp, how to speed up the fans.
I found a shield to control pwm fans. Now I am looking for a smart gadget to measure the temp of my liquid. There are components from aquacomputer, which can be connected to to a g1/4 socket. Unfortunately I have no idea, how to connect these to my arduino and read out the signals, to convert them to celsius representations; and there seems to be no specification. Its a 10 kOhm sensor...
Do you have any idea, how to measure the temp of liquid in my water cooling loop?
Thanks in advance!

There are components from aquacomputer, which can be connected to to a g1/4 socket

Any chance you could do a bit more than a passing reference to the hardware in question and actually
post links to exactly what you mean? Full details means quick answers, lack of information leads to Q&A sessions that
waste time for all concerned. Don't mean to be rude, but its not possible to explain how to interface
to an unknown piece of hardware....

I doubt that a thermocouple is the right tool to measure the small temp range (~10-50C) of a computer water cooling system. It can be done better and cheaper with e.g. a DS18B20.

Leo..

Bigfoot0485:
Its a 10 kOhm sensor...

Best guess: it's a thermistor. Warm it with your hands and the resistance should drop.
You need to know the thermal parameters of the thing to be able to read the temperature with it. Depending on the type they can be very precise.

Bigfoot0485:
I have no idea, how to connect these to my arduino and read out the signals, to convert them to celsius representations; and there seems to be no specification. Its a 10 kOhm sensor...

It is very likely a thermistor and really all you need. Using a thermocouple for a job like this is absurd. A DS18B20 is only about $3 and is very easy to use, as it speaks english, gives degrees C by default, and you don't need to know about thermal characteristics. There is lots of stuff on both DS18B20 and thermistors in this forum.
Sealing the sensor to the outside of a coolant pipe and under insulation should be quite satisfactory.

I would second Nick... use a DS18B20. It may SEEM "complicated" at first... but it really isn't too bad, and is WELL worth getting to "know".

Be careful that the sensor and the water INSIDE your system are in good "communication". Let's say that the sensor (if DS18B20, a little blob of plastic with some silicon inside) is at, say, 10 deg C, and water NOW is 10 deg C... no problem. And then water, for whatever reason, suddenly becomes 15 deg C. The transfer of that heat to the silicon will never be instantaneous... be sure do whatever you can to minimize the lag.

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Probably not the BEST "Arduinos and DS18B20" tutorial on the net, but MY tutorial... I try to write them with the person who DOESN'T "just know" some of the things often not mentioned...

http://sheepdogguides.com/arduino/DS18B20-HowTo.htm