micing audio levels of drums

Here's my idea. Please share your concerns.

I have 5 keyes microphones for the arduino. I have the 4 pins soldered to RJ-45 female (using 4 of 8 of the connectors) suspended on a clamp-like device that hangs close to the drum being mic'ed (a bass drum for instance). Do this 4 more times with snare, hi-hat, etc. I use 5 ethernet cables to connect the RJ-45 female Keyes Mic end to a breadboard and raspberry pi which routes everything to ground / analog in / etc. I use the arduino to basically sort out thresholds to determine whether a drum has been hit. If it registers over a certain threshold, it will send the value on.

I can manage the part after I get the data pumping in the serial monitor; I'm confident with that.

Can +, G, A0, D0 be extended over RJ-45 and many feet of cable without worries?

Is 5V from Arduino enough to power these 5 microphones? (there are only two slots in the arduino, but maybe they can just be routed to the breadboard for extended slots?

I know only enough about electronics to be dangerous. Or maybe this isn't so bad.

Let me know if there are other things I should be worried about.

HI ARDUINO COMMUNITY.

-j

Can +, G, A0, D0 be extended over RJ-45 and many feet of cable without worries?

No.

s 5V from Arduino enough to power these 5 microphones?

Wrong question. Normally you do not power microphones with 5V, do you mean the microphone amplifiers?

Please describe your equipment.

I have 5 keyes microphones

I don't know what those are...

Can +, G, A0, D0 be extended over RJ-45 and many feet of cable without worries?

In your application, I'd say yes.

In general...

Digital data is OK at reasonable speeds. These cables are made for digital data, but in order to get Ethernet speeds over long distances you have to use the wire-pairs correctly and drive/terminate with the right impedance. But, the Arduino doesn't run that fast anyway and you don't need crazy-fast speeds.

I wouldn't use an Ethernet cable as a normal microphone (audio connection). Microphone signals are small, so normal microphone cables are shielded, and stage/studio mics use balanced connections with shielded cables. If you use unshielded cables, you'll pick up hum. However, you have a couple of things going for you - Drums are loud, and you are close-micing. That means you have a very strong signal. Secondly, since you are not listening to the sound noise is not an issue as long as the noise is not strong enough to generate a false-trigger. I suspect, you'll be OK.

If you draw too much current over a long distance you'll get voltage drop and there's a current limit for RJ45 connectors (maybe 1A but I don't remember). I might not trust network cables for powering an Arduino but you can power a couple of LEDs, and you should be able to power a couple of electret microphones. You can get-away with longer runs (more voltage drop) if the power doesn't need to be regulated, or if it's regulated at the "far end".

Is 5V from Arduino enough to power these 5 microphones? (there are only two slots in the arduino, but maybe they can just be routed to the breadboard for extended slots?

I think 5 electret microphones will be OK.

The amount of current you can get from the 5V pin gets "fuzzy". The more voltage you "drop" across the Arduino's 5V regulator, the hotter it gets and the less current you can get without it shutting down.

You can make multiple connections to one +5V or one ground contact on the Arudino.

DVDdoug: I don't know what those are...

In your application, I'd say yes.

In general...

Digital data is OK at reasonable speeds. These cables are made for digital data, but in order to get Ethernet speeds over long distances you have to use the wire-pairs correctly and drive/terminate with the right impedance. But, the Arduino doesn't run that fast anyway and you don't need crazy-fast speeds.

I wouldn't use an Ethernet cable as a normal microphone (audio connection). Microphone signals are small, so normal microphone cables are shielded, and stage/studio mics use balanced connections with shielded cables. If you use unshielded cables, you'll pick up hum. However, you have a couple of things going for you - Drums are loud, and you are close-micing. That means you have a very strong signal. Secondly, since you are not listening to the sound noise is not an issue as long as the noise is not strong enough to generate a false-trigger. I suspect, you'll be OK.

If you draw too much current over a long distance you'll get voltage drop and there's a current limit for RJ45 connectors (maybe 1A but I don't remember). I might not trust network cables for powering an Arduino but you can power a couple of LEDs, and you should be able to power a couple of electret microphones. You can get-away with longer runs (more voltage drop) if the power doesn't need to be regulated, or if it's regulated at the "far end". I think 5 electret microphones will be OK.

The amount of current you can get from the 5V pin gets "fuzzy". The more voltage you "drop" across the Arduino's 5V regulator, the hotter it gets and the less current you can get without it shutting down.

You can make multiple connections to one +5V or one ground contact on the Arudino.

Thanks for your response!

Well, all in all the length of said ethernet cable would be from 2 ft. to maybe 40 ft. So not that long I suppose. The keyes mic (google img) looks like this: |500x375.

Not sure if this mic is the best here. A simple electret mic would be better?

As I understand from some of your other posts, DVDdoug, you're quite the expert here. It sounds like what I need is a hardware based Peak Detection Circuit. I've seen schematics, although they look 'way' over my head. And I'm not even quite sure at this point these Keyes Mic's will play a part in such a circuit. Is that what I'm looking for and do you know of any tutorials or basic schematics for such a rig?

I also wonder if these electret mics are somewhat selective or directional. I.E. more like a dynamic mic or a condensor in their responsiveness. A mic pointed at the snare should pick up primarily the snare and not the hi-hat even if that is just a few inches away also. Thanks for your help.