Modified Prototyping Board (Radio Shack Electronics Board / Arduino Uno R3)

Forrest Mimms could go a step further - or maybe the "Shack" could catch on to this sort of thing.

Anyhow, I just wanted to share.

I also have more detailed pictures if you click on the user photos on Amazon for the Radio Shack Electronics Learning Lab.

In a rather simple manner I affixed my Uno R3 to my Radio Shack Electronics Learning Lab over the transformer, which I am not likely to use. I am also considering replacing the rather pitiful ammeter with something more useful - like a Harbor Freight digital multimeter and solder the test probe terminals to the spring terminals on the board.

Also I am going to go ahead and convert the system to a regulated, wired power supply as currently the board only has batteries. In short, I wanted a budget Arduino development board with pots and LEDs and everything else integrated so I can work more quickly. It will also help when I get my QFP to DIP converter!

In short I just want to share what has made my Arduino experience more comfortable - and easier to learn on. I've resurrected old Physics textbooks from Amazon, ordered a few books on C++, and I'm trying to most effectively work myself through the Mimms material, then onto more advanced things to take things further. As a neophyte microcontroller hobbyist it takes some creativity - even just a tiny bit of hacking - to get yourself comfortable with the medium. And this is the result of asking, "why not," and then doing.

I hope that others do the same thing -or similar. You can find these learning labs on craigslist for no more than a song sometimes!

moncureww: Forrest Mimms could go a step further - or maybe the "Shack" could catch on to this sort of thing.

Anyhow, I just wanted to share.

I also have more detailed pictures if you click on the user photos on Amazon for the Radio Shack Electronics Learning Lab.

In a rather simple manner I affixed my Uno R3 to my Radio Shack Electronics Learning Lab over the transformer, which I am not likely to use. I am also considering replacing the rather pitiful ammeter with something more useful - like a Harbor Freight digital multimeter and solder the test probe terminals to the spring terminals on the board.

Also I am going to go ahead and convert the system to a regulated, wired power supply as currently the board only has batteries. In short, I wanted a budget Arduino development board with pots and LEDs and everything else integrated so I can work more quickly. It will also help when I get my QFP to DIP converter!

In short I just want to share what has made my Arduino experience more comfortable - and easier to learn on. I've resurrected old Physics textbooks from Amazon, ordered a few books on C++, and I'm trying to most effectively work myself through the Mimms material, then onto more advanced things to take things further. As a neophyte microcontroller hobbyist it takes some creativity - even just a tiny bit of hacking - to get yourself comfortable with the medium. And this is the result of asking, "why not," and then doing.

I hope that others do the same thing -or similar. You can find these learning labs on craigslist for no more than a song sometimes!

I once found one of those at a Goodwill for nothing, and then somewhere along the way I got rid of it (I think I gave it back to Goodwill!) - I still kick myself over it.

i have several Radio Shack Electronics Learning Labs that I'm trying to combine with Arduinos for some middle school and high school kids. I've got some ideas, but would love to see what others have done. Your pix seem to have disappeared. Could you send me a couple? chuckm at 3rivers dot net