Modifying original sketches

Not sure if this would be the best place to ask this, but let's try.

I finished my PCB which is originally based on Nick Gammon's code from here. However, since my wiring is slightly different (SW vs HW SPI), and plus I have different user interaction mechanism than he have (I use TFT screen + some additional buttons and joystick) I had to modify his code (some stuff removed) and to add some additional pieces, so I was just wondering about one part in sketch, if this should be OK (so that people don't get confused):

// Original Author: Nick Gammon

// Modified by ...

/*
For original project idea, details, photos, wiring, instructions, see:
Gammon Forum : Electronics : Microprocessors : Atmega chip stand-alone programmer to upload .hex files
Copyright 2012 Nick Gammon.
...
*/

vs

/*
For more details, photos, wiring, instructions, see:
Gammon Forum : Electronics : Microprocessors : Atmega chip stand-alone programmer to upload .hex files

Copyright 2012 Nick Gammon.
...

What's your approach in order to respect original authors and also to avoid similar confusion with wiring?

Probably best move for you would be to read up on just what copyright means.

This is what’s in original sketch:

/*
For more details, photos, wiring, instructions, see:
Gammon Forum : Electronics : Microprocessors : Atmega chip stand-alone programmer to upload .hex files
Copyright 2012 Nick Gammon.

PERMISSION TO DISTRIBUTE

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of this software
and associated documentation files (the “Software”), to deal in the Software without restriction,
including without limitation the rights to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense,
**and/or sell copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so, **
subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

LIMITATION OF LIABILITY

The software is provided “as is”, without warranty of any kind, express or implied,
including but not limited to the warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular
purpose and noninfringement. In no event shall the authors or copyright holders be liable
for any claim, damages or other liability, whether in an action of contract,
tort or otherwise, arising from, out of or in connection with the software
or the use or other dealings in the software.
*/

My understanding is that what I want to do should be fine, but I’m not an expert in this copyright thing at all, so just wanted to hear some additional opinion by you guys.

Sounds like the MIT license or something similar, which basically means you can do what you like with it, just don't say it's yours.

Copyright laws differ from country to country, and it's complex matter.

wvmarle:
Sounds like the MIT license or something similar, which basically means you can do what you like with it, just don't say it's yours.

Copyright laws differ from country to country, and it's complex matter.

If the country is a member of the United Nations, all their copyright laws must follow that standard.

Paul

Just look at the difference between US and most European countries… afaik the US is (still) a member of the UN.

Your best bet is to understand what someone else’s code does then write your own - That way you become a better more clever person and importantly can maintain and when needed upgrade your device.
You need then only worry about copy right only libraries.

vsavic:
I finished my PCB which is originally based on Nick Gammon's code from

If the modified program is only for your own personal use then all that matters is whether you have permission to use the code and, almost certainly you do. If the code is just for your own use then, as nobody else will ever see the code it hardly matters what it contains.

It is only if you plan to distribute the modified program for other people to use that it becomes necessary to consider additional obligations imposed by copyright conditions applying to the pieces of code you have copied from other people.

...R

Well I was thinking to put it on git together with PCB files.

That's be distribution.

wvmarle:
That's be distribution.

And in that case you need to ensure that everyone reading your Github material is aware of the copyright requirements of the authors of any code that you include in your project.

Usually the purpose of OpenSource copyright conditions is to prevent a future user from claiming that the code is a restricted commercial product. However you need to read the terms carefully as there are a few variants in common use.

If you are planning to make a commercial product including some OpenSource code then I suggest you get professional legal advice to ensure that your own Intellectual Property is properly protected.

...R