Motor controller

Hi, I bought this motor controller http://cgi.ebay.it/24V-350W-Brush-Motor-Controller-For-Scooter-E-Bike-YK40-/180527841314?cmd=ViewItem&pt=UK_Sporting_Goods_Scooters_LE&hash=item2a084c4022 , I'd like to use it with arduino. I have a 250W brushed motor of a wheelchair. How can I connect and use it with arduino? I'd like to change the motor speed with the output of an accellerometer. I made some project with accellerometer, now the only problem is how to interface the motor controller with arduino.

Unless I missed it, the link is to an Ebay page with no technical info at all on the controller. Unless, by extreme good fortune, someone has used that model before it's unlikely you'll get much help tbh.

Is there a data sheet for it?

Thanks, for the answers. I think in all hall effect throttle, there is only a hall effect sensor and some magnets, or I mistake? Here an example that I found http://www.theworkshop.ca/energy/picox/UGN3503_hall_sensor.JPG on google. My idea was to replace the hall effect with one or some arduino output pins. In other word simulate the behavior of the hall effect throttle with arduino. Is it possible?

Perhaps by "hall effect" they are using such a thing (hall effect IC) for current sensing and adjusting the PWM to the motor to keep the speed proportional to load?

Well - some searching now says "nope"...

But this guy seems to know his way around the internals (of at least one yiyun controller):

http://www.theworkshop.ca/energy/dirt_e/2/2.htm

From here:

http://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=278&start=225

:)

This thread:

http://endless-sphere.com/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=6145

Seems to be indicating that a "hall effect" throttle only has "high" and "low" speeds (and "off")? If so, you may be able to ground one or the other pin to the third on the throttle plug, in effect gaining two speeds (not sure if you could PWM on those pins or not)...?

I am new to the Arduino boards, so please bear with me. I have a duemilanove board that i am using with the "official motor drive shield" from emartee.com. The setup is meant to run the Tamiya dual motor gearbox with tank tracks. Running them off of the 2.1 jackand a 9v, it seems as though the motors don't get enough juice, and I get a slow run, pause, slow run, pause. How do I get more juice?

How do I get more juice?

Squeeze more oranges?

You need to power the motors (or motor driver board) separately from how you power the Arduino, with the grounds connected. Use some decent RC batteries to power the motors.

Looking at the Motor Driver Shield, I can't see where I should connect EXT power. doesn't have the terminal blocks, and this shield is meant to sit on top, so pins terminate at the top of the shield. How many oranges do you recommend?lol

Looking at the Motor Driver Shield, I can't see where I should connect EXT power.

Perhaps a link to the device you actually have would be useful.

My Bad…Thanks for the help.
http://www.emartee.com/product/41802/Arduino-Official-Motor-Drive-Shield-L293D

Looking at the Motor Driver Shield, I can't see where I should connect EXT power. doesn't have the terminal blocks, and this shield is meant to sit on top, so pins terminate at the top of the shield.

OK - so what I can see from here:

http://emartee.com/product/41802/Arduino-Official-Motor-Drive-Shield-L293D

And here:

http://arduino.cc/en/Main/ArduinoMotorShield

(and the pages that branch off)

Is that the four pins at the "bottom" of the shield, the "rightmost" one named "9V" is the "external input". According to everything I can see and the Arduino schematic here:

http://arduino.cc/en/uploads/Main/arduino-duemilanove-schematic.pdf

That pin is connected to "VIN", which is coming straight off the power plug (more or less) on the Arduino.

First thing to try would be to dump the 9V battery, and hook up something like a 7.2 or 9.6 V RC pack - something with a little more current capability, in other words. You could also try a battery pack of AA batteries or C-cells if you wanted to (up to 12 volts - but I would stick with 9V or so, because of the voltage regulator on the Ardunio having to dump the extra voltage as heat, mostly).

If you are still having speed issues due to current issues, you could run the Arduino off of one battery or pack, and clip/desolder that 9V lead on the motor driver, then solder wires from the pad (and ground on the board) to another battery/pack to run the board separate from the Arduino.

Finally - if none of the above help, then it may be the code! Is the code doing some form of PWM? If it is, it may be that it is running slow because the duty-cycle is low on the PWM. Please post the code you are running...?

If you are running the code at the emartee site, have you tried changing the PWM from 250 to 255 (255 = always on)?

Once again, please post your code...

:)

Awesome…when I get home, I will post code.( boss frowns on robot projects during work) good stuff.

I was afraid of that...great tips from you guys, thanks. Caveat emptor.

Thanks to all. So the hall effect throttles are super simple. A magnet mounted on a piece that turns, and the magnet passes by a sensor. You can hack up the throttle pretty small (like I did on Bigfoot, also a link in my sig.), or remount the parts to get the correct movement, as somebody said here: http://www.modifiedpowerwheels.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=4054&SearchTerms=hall,effect,magnet

About hall effect throttle I found also: this interesting thread: http://www.modifiedpowerwheels.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=3247&SearchTerms=hall,effect,magnet

then I found this http://www.modifiedpowerwheels.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=13755&SearchTerms=hall,effect,throttle

I also found this about a pic instead of a hall effect throttle: http://www.picbasic.co.uk/forum/showthread.php?t=11942&pagenumber=

here seems that there is somebody that show how hall effect pedal works: http://www.modifiedpowerwheels.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=10377&SearchTerms=hall,effect,magnet

there are also some information here: http://www.modifiedpowerwheels.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=774&SearchTerms=hall,effect,magnet

It may be a nice board, but since they don't publish a schematic diagram, you are correct that there is no documentation of how the manage power on that board. I don't buy products from vendors who market sophisticated electronic modules as if they were cabbages.

Richard, its the standard motor driver board - specs and docs are on/available from arduino.cc as I linked to. I will agree with you that they should've linked to them as well, and hinted at that it isn't their design (and gave thanks, etc). Also - it would've been nice to know whether it is version 3 or an earlier design (not sure there).

:)

Awesome...when I get home, I will post code.( boss frowns on robot projects during work) good stuff.

First off - I want to appologize to bpso - there's a small "threadjack" occurring, and I inadvertently am helping perpetuate it. I'm sorry.

:-/

To spaceballs:

Next time, start a new thread.

When you post your code, start a new thread with it; if you want, reference this thread so that others can follow what you are going on about (you might want to preamble your code post with your first post from here, though). Give the thread a new name like "Motor Speed on Official Motor Drive Shield" or something like that.

This way, this thread won't be "jacked", and your thread will make sense, too - for you and others in the future...

:)

Richard, yes I saw that, I hope that this is a standard and I hope that also voltage are standard. If it is as described in that thread, control the motor should be easy. P.S. Cr0sh never mind :P