Motor vehicle response to road excitation

Hello! we are two guys who would like to apply the Arduino to a motorcycle for a university project.
Our goal is to obtain an arduino box capable of recording a cloud of data deriving from the sensors.
In particular, we would like this application to be exploitable in motorsport and therefore we would like to be able to take advantage of the remote control of Arduino by means of the GSM module in order to be able to create different data files for each lap on the circuit.

The variables of our system that we would like to measure using sensors are the following:

  • speed and position (with GPS module)
  • lap times
  • lean angle
  • wheelie angle
  • displacement of the front and rear suspensions (in order to capture the road excitement). The latter 3 characteristics would be measured by a combination of Accelerometer and Gyroscope.

It is our first time with Arduino, we ask if it is possible, a detailed list of all the components that we would need: both the main and minor components such as cables, batteries and any component that we need to have the finished system.

Thanks in advance for the answers!

stefano369:
It is our first time with Arduino, we ask if it is possible, a detailed list of all the components that we would need: both the main and minor components such as cables, batteries and any component that we need to have the finished system.

As you are University guys and therefore should know a great deal more about motor cycle data collection than I do it is up to you to figure out the components needed. This Forum is not a "cheat to get my degree" Forum.

OR, if you have to ask someone to provide such basic information then this project is far too complex for your present level of knowledge.

If you have a specific sensor (including a link to its datasheet) and you are having trouble with a program to collect its data we will certainly try to help if you post the program and explain what it actually does and what it ought to do.

You need to consider how many data points need to be collected and whether the small memory of an Arduino can hold all the data. A RaspberryPi might be more suitable, or even an RPi in conjunction with an Arduino.

I think you will find it difficult (or impossible) to figure out the lean angle without some external point of reference.

...R

any component that we need to have the finished system.

Should we recommend a nice looking box, too?

There are may Arduino forum posts where people have tried to measure the lean angle. I don't recall anyone reporting success, so start there.

All this is much, much more difficult than you imagine.

I'd start be feeding "Ruggedized compact datalogger" or similar into Google and see what's out there.

For lean angle you will need a full IMU, accelerometers will not give you this, so among the sensors some
sort of 6 or 9DoF IMU would be a must-have - many produce a full attitude value (quarternion or DCM) as
well as raw accelerometer and rate-gyro data - collect all of it... Single accelerometers on the wheel
subframes would probably get good info on their movement relative to the main frame.

There could be a role with Arduinos for reading various sensors (which will be I2C or SPI typically) and
sending on to the datalogger if it doesn't support such protocols directly.

You'd probably want to capture steering angle too, that might be a challenge.

Motorcycles lean sensing isn’t simple, there’s are opposing centrifugal forces that counter the accelerometer. It’s why they don’t fall over. I wonder how stable the gyro is when there are jolts. Using speed and accelerometer it may be possible to estimate the angle... anyhow good luck. Why don’t you try to put it together then ask specific questions if something isn’t working instead of just asking folks to design it for you.

Lean estimation is done by using a full IMU as I've said, that gives orientation in 3D, from which lean
is easily extractible. And yes you do want to isolate your IMU from vibration as much as possible, for
best accuracy, but MEMS gyros are carefully designed to respond to rotation only and should cope reasonably.