multiple arduinos communication

hi,

I want to do project with multiple arduinos communication (wireless):
4 arduinos with gyroscope,
if one of the four move he will send signal to fifth arduino and the fifth arduino will vibration one time,
if another one move he will send signal to the same fifth arduino and this time he will vibration twice,
if another from the four arduinos moves he will send signal to the fifth arduino and he will vibration three time, and so on.

I want this project to be tiny as it can and wireless so i thought to use those parts:
5 nano arduinos, NRF24L01+ (for the communication), BMG160 gyroscope, vibration motor and to active all the arduinos with batteries.

is it possible? do you think that other parts will be better?

thanks

That should work, no problem.

However if small size is important it would be better to use an Arduino that runs on 3v and then you could power the whole thing from a pair of AA alkaline cells. The nRF24 needs 3v in any case. I don't think you can get a 3v Nano but you can get a 3v Micro.

Another possibility (and they way I do it) is to use an Atmega 328 running at 8MH using its internal oscillator and mounted on some stripboard (vero board).

This Simple nRF24L01+ Tutorial should help get you started.

Wireless problems can be very difficult to debug so get the wireless part working on its own before you start adding any other features.

Be aware that if two of your Arduinos transmit at the same time both messages will be garbled. One way to deal with that is to have the master poll the slaves in turn using the concept in my second example. It can easily do that several times per second.

...R

There is also a version of the Pro Mini that runs at 3V. It is the smallest I have used so far (just larger than my whole thumb).

See Arduino board specifications for ore information.

adwsystems:
There is also a version of the Pro Mini that runs at 3V.

I had forgotten about them. They would probably be easier to work with than a Micro.

...R

Robin2:
I had forgotten about them. They would probably be easier to work with than a Micro.

...R

The Micro has USB but different USB than the UNO and Mega. Pro Mini doesn't have any USB onboard.

Easier to work with??? I don't know. I haven't with the Micro...yet.

adwsystems:
The Micro has USB but different USB than the UNO and Mega. Pro Mini doesn't have any USB onboard.

Ya can't win :slight_smile:

I thought the fact that the Pro Mini uses the Atmega 328 (or 168) would be simpler than the Micro which uses the 32U4. But the USB connection would win my vote.

...R

Robin2:
Ya can’t win :slight_smile:

I thought the fact that the Pro Mini uses the Atmega 328 (or 168) would be simpler than the Micro which uses the 32U4. But the USB connection would win my vote.

…R

He’s an irony (advantage) I found about using the Mini/Pro Mini. You have to use an external FTDI USB board for programming via a 6 pin header. The header on (many of) the FTDI boards are usually 90 degrees (parallel to the PCB). So if you use a straight header on the Mini, the programming port is now vertical. That means when the Arduino is mounted flat in the bottom of the enclosure, you don’t have to leave space in the enclosure to connect the USB cable to the Arduino. I find it takes a lot more space for the cable and fingers as it does for the FTDI board.