Music reactive Ledstrip

Hi, Im starter in Arduino
Im planning to build something similar like in this video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5oRir4dck_w&t=117s
  • I have BTF-LIGHTING WS2812B 144Led pixel strip according to other pervious tutorial
    each LED color requires 20mA which means 1 RGB LED 60mA, so all together almost 9 Amper

  • I have a 12V 10A power supply

  • And Im using voltage and amper stepdown module
    I have already calibrate it to 5V

however, one of the interesting part that according to the description of Ledstrip, it requires 6V

  • Im planning to use Elegoo Nano
    And as far I know basic arduino uno works with 5V and as somebody described it "max 1 Amper"

Unfortunately in the pervious video tutorial doesnt give answer

So my question is how provide enough Amper to the Led to be smooth without damage the microcontroller
and eventually does it require 5 or 6V, because I tested just the Ledstrip on arduino and it ran through arduino which theoratically 5V?

Any answer is appreciated

If it is a WS2812B, it is 5V. Probably a typo.

.

You can't power the LED strip with the Arduino. You can only control it with the Arduino.

Assuming 5V is correct, you'll need a different power supply. It's possible to buy or build a 10A switchmode stepdown DC-DC converter but it would add extra "stuff" and it wouldn't be as economical as getting the correct power supply to begin with.

DVDdoug:
You can't power the LED strip with the Arduino. You can only control it with the Arduino.

Assuming 5V is correct, you'll need a different power supply. It's possible to buy or build a 10A switchmode stepdown DC-DC converter but it would add extra "stuff" and it wouldn't be as economical as getting the correct power supply to begin with.

well in the shematics its not so clear, but the arduino doesnt power the Ledstrip/ each of them(Sound detector, Ledstrip and microcontroller) are connected directly through the step down module to the power supply only the the output signal connected to the ledstrip from arduino, so theoraticaly they are separate

Do I need to step down 10A to 8A for the Ledstrip?

No. If it wants 8A then it will accept 8A from the power supply. It doesn't matter how big the power supply is, only the voltage and that it's big enough.

Listening to your suggestion, I have tested from two separate power source

  1. from USB the microcontroller which powers the sound sensor and gives signal to the LED strip
  2. from 12V10A power supply through a 5 V step down module that powes the LED strip

however I didnt solder the LED strip connection to the stepdown module and if I slightly touch its effects
which LED turns on or blinking on the step down module

CC/CV Red LED: Charging in constant current mode
CH Blue LED: Fully charged
OK Red LED: Charging in Constant Voltage Mode

so occasionally the LEDstrip ,- like for instance CH Blue LED light up,- its brighter however if its just OK than sometimes not even lightning or only the first 8-10 LED,(Im not sure if its normal)
here is the code

https://github.com/hansjny/Natural-Nerd/blob/master/arduino/soundsread2/sound_reactive.ino#L1

My point is that I dont think its react to the sound,

I dunno if the problem
A) is in the soundsensor
B) in the code (however I followed the pin instruction)
C) in the connection
D) or do I just need create a spiral with the LEDstrip so the EQ can be visible?

if somebody accidentaly have any clue where is the problem would be appreciated

Did you connect the grounds as well as the signal?

If the led strip needs 6V then give it 6V on the proper lead and ground to the strip and the arduino.

A buck converter will take 6V down to 5V for the Arduino. Try to keep total current flowing through the Arduino to 100mA (200 max for short time) or less and power external devices directly from the power source.

this how it looks like
the microcontroller gets the power so far from USB
and soundsensor powered trough the microcontroller
I have calibrate the treshold of the sound sensor and tested so it works

I think one of my led strip just died
I assume because of the CH and CC/CV LED was lightning instead of the OK lead

CC/CV Red LED: Charging in constant current mode
CH Blue LED: Fully charged
OK Red LED: Charging in Constant Voltage Mode

I have already step down to 5 V
so I have no idea why it happened,
however apart from the step down module power supply side is nothing soldered yet

BTW its turned out that the voltage and current converter cant handle more than 3A, and I havent calibrated it, however than I dont understand why it turns the LED from OK to CH(fully charged) on buck converter?

And an other question if I want only want step the voltage as in the video instruction, where he use buck converter where the there is only potential meter for the voltage, doe it mean that current stay the same as it flow through?
Im just asking, because I just started due lack of information from the video and source (like controversy of the power supply which I mentioned before) that following his instruction it can work if somebody could confirm it, would be appreciated,
So than I just only need to purchase a voltage buck converter like in the video

or a proper current with max 10A and voltage

Hi,
If you look you can get 5V SMPS that can supply the current you need, that will mean you don’t have to use a DC-DC converter.

Tom… :slight_smile:

sure I can easliy with 600mA :confused:, however for 150LED its nothing

does this converter can do the job?

(fixed URL tag - moderator)

How about 5V 20A for < 10EU?

Only it probably shouldn’t be run at > 12A continuous. Always get more supply capacity than you need, twice is good, the supply will run longer, a lot longer than one that’s running within 20% of max.

My question relating to the pervious comment, I asked in different places about this question, and I got divided answers

So if anybody electro engineering expert could answer to confirm, that

if Im using a 10A power supply switch for the LEDstrip(144LED), however it will only use 8.6A
(144x 60mA), wont that extra 1.4 A heat up more the LEDstrip, or in longterm or short term damage?

No. Power supply capacity is only capacity. It tries to make all the circuit will take and the capacity is how much before the supply breaks down immediately.

You don't want to push a switching power supply even close to maximum for long, when it does start to go bad it will make spiky output and often take out other components first as many cheap PC owner found out.

What horsepower is your car capable of? What top speed? If you go slower, will the engine get hotter?

PS I learned this from the electronic engineers who taught me to build my own PC back in the 80's.
Always get more switching power supply than you need. If you can, get twice as much as you ever will need. The more the PSU loafs, the longer it will run clean. It only makes what you takes.

thank you