My 1st project: TIE Crawler from the Star Wars Expanded Universe

HazardsMind: Yea, well I think it is.

Good to know! :) However as soon as possible I'll let you know the size of the tank, so that you can tell me which components are good and can fit inside it. :)

Exact measurements, if you can.

HazardsMind:
Exact measurements, if you can.

Sure! :slight_smile: However I have a question. Would this WII controller (on the left) be good for the tank? It has just 1 pad and the L and R buttons!
I just saw now that it has a USB cable that connects it to the other controller (on the right) and maybe this could be a problem.

What’s your opinion about it?

There is a library you could use if you plan on just using the Nunchuck alone, but if you want to use both then you would need to get a USB host shield and bluetooth dongle. However if you use this Wii classic controller, it too has its own library and it is easy to set up.

HazardsMind: There is a library you could use if you plan on just using the Nunchuck alone, but if you want to use both then you would need to get a USB host shield and bluetooth dongle. However if you use this Wii classic controller, it too has its own library and it is easy to set up.

The Nunchuck alone is enough. I can use it to control the whole tank. My idea is this:

  • L button for left movements (in both cases: when tank is moving and when it is not moving)
  • R button for right movements (same thing for the L button)
  • Pad for forwards and backwards movements

But the problem is that I want to use it without the cable. What can the library do?

There is no L and R, there is Z and C, have another look at it. Also you're not going to fit everything inside it, so you will need to use the cable.

HazardsMind: There is no L and R, there is Z and C, have another look at it. Also you're not going to fit everything inside it, so you will need to use the cable.

So I'll make the controller by myself. Do you think that inside the tank it will be needed a fan (a computer fan) to avoid a possible overheating of the components?

No, air slits should be enough, but you should always test your components first before the final installation.

HazardsMind:
No, air slits should be enough, but you should always test your components first before the final installation.

Ok. Then I’ll make air slits. Do you know if aluminium oxidizes?

It does but it takes a very long time. A lot longer than steel or iron does.

HazardsMind: It does but it takes a very long time. A lot longer than steel or iron does.

Do you know how much? :) However you gave me a good news! Thank you.

About the tracks, I found them, but in plastic! Do you think that they would be able to support the weight of the tank?

What tracks did you get? I won’t know unless I see them. Are they lego treads?

HazardsMind: What tracks did you get? I won't know unless I see them. Are they lego treads?

I didn't get them already. But they aren't LEGO. They are for Revell plastic models, but they can be extended adding other components of the same type of track.

Do you have a link?

HazardsMind:
Do you have a link?

Well…I found the website of the shop, but it is in german and, moreover, it hasn’t a list of toys and models and models’ components.
However I’m not finding the aluminium sphere. So I’m changing the project.

I’ll create a tank using the frontal cockpit of an AT-TE (or its back side).

HazardsMind: Simple design with Skid steering, the code should be very simple too. From your picture, there doesn't seem to be a lot of room, where do you plan to put everything? The motor controller you may be able to salvage or just make your own, and you might want to use either an Arduino Nano, micro, or Mini.

Hi HazardsMind,

some weeks ago, you suggested to use Arduino Nano, Micro, or Mini. Actually I'm thinking to another project (to start working on after the tank) and where one of these Arduino components could be required. But I need some informations: which is the difference in size and the difference from a technical point of view between Arduino Nano, Micro, and Mini.

Could you give me some informations, please? :)

Nano:

Microcontroller Atmel ATmega168 or ATmega328 Operating Voltage (logic level) 5 V Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12 V Input Voltage (limits) 6-20 V Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output) Analog Input Pins 8 DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA Flash Memory 16 KB (ATmega168) or 32 KB (ATmega328) of which 2 KB used by bootloader SRAM 1 KB (ATmega168) or 2 KB (ATmega328) EEPROM 512 bytes (ATmega168) or 1 KB (ATmega328) Clock Speed 16 MHz Dimensions 0.73" x 1.70" cm

Micro:

The maximum length and width of the Micro PCB are 4.8cm and 1.77cm respectively, with the USB connector extending beyond the former dimension. The layout allows for easy placement on a solderless breadboard.

Microcontroller ATmega32u4 Operating Voltage 5V Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V Input Voltage (limits) 6-20V Digital I/O Pins 20 PWM Channels 7 Analog Input Channels 12 DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA Flash Memory 32 KB (ATmega32u4) of which 4 KB used by bootloader SRAM 2.5 KB (ATmega32u4) EEPROM 1 KB (ATmega32u4) Clock Speed 16 MHz

Mini:

The dimensions of the Mini PCB are approximately 0.7" x 1.3" cm.

Microcontroller ATmega328 Operating Voltage 5V Input Voltage 7-9 V Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output) Analog Input Pins 8 (of which 4 are broken out onto pins) DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA Flash Memory 32 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader) SRAM 2 KB EEPROM 1 KB Clock Speed 16 MHz

Mini Pro

The dimensions of the Pro Mini PCB are approximately 0.7" x 1.3" cm.

Microcontroller ATmega168 Operating Voltage 3.3V or 5V (depending on model) Input Voltage 3.35 -12 V (3.3V model) or 5 - 12 V (5V model) Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output) Analog Input Pins 8 DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA Flash Memory 16 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader) SRAM 1 KB EEPROM 512 bytes Clock Speed 8 MHz (3.3V model) or 16 MHz (5V model)

HazardsMind: Nano:

Microcontroller Atmel ATmega168 or ATmega328 Operating Voltage (logic level) 5 V Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12 V Input Voltage (limits) 6-20 V Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output) Analog Input Pins 8 DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA Flash Memory 16 KB (ATmega168) or 32 KB (ATmega328) of which 2 KB used by bootloader SRAM 1 KB (ATmega168) or 2 KB (ATmega328) EEPROM 512 bytes (ATmega168) or 1 KB (ATmega328) Clock Speed 16 MHz Dimensions 0.73" x 1.70" cm

Micro:

The maximum length and width of the Micro PCB are 4.8cm and 1.77cm respectively, with the USB connector extending beyond the former dimension. The layout allows for easy placement on a solderless breadboard.

Microcontroller ATmega32u4 Operating Voltage 5V Input Voltage (recommended) 7-12V Input Voltage (limits) 6-20V Digital I/O Pins 20 PWM Channels 7 Analog Input Channels 12 DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA DC Current for 3.3V Pin 50 mA Flash Memory 32 KB (ATmega32u4) of which 4 KB used by bootloader SRAM 2.5 KB (ATmega32u4) EEPROM 1 KB (ATmega32u4) Clock Speed 16 MHz

Mini:

The dimensions of the Mini PCB are approximately 0.7" x 1.3" cm.

Microcontroller ATmega328 Operating Voltage 5V Input Voltage 7-9 V Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output) Analog Input Pins 8 (of which 4 are broken out onto pins) DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA Flash Memory 32 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader) SRAM 2 KB EEPROM 1 KB Clock Speed 16 MHz

Mini Pro

The dimensions of the Pro Mini PCB are approximately 0.7" x 1.3" cm.

Microcontroller ATmega168 Operating Voltage 3.3V or 5V (depending on model) Input Voltage 3.35 -12 V (3.3V model) or 5 - 12 V (5V model) Digital I/O Pins 14 (of which 6 provide PWM output) Analog Input Pins 8 DC Current per I/O Pin 40 mA Flash Memory 16 KB (of which 2 KB used by bootloader) SRAM 1 KB EEPROM 512 bytes Clock Speed 8 MHz (3.3V model) or 16 MHz (5V model)

Awesome! Can Arduino Nano, Mini and Micro work alone? I mean, as single and unique multifunction component. Or do they need to be connected to another component?

You have an Uno or a Mega right, do they work alone? Answer my question and you will have answered your question.

There are custom breakout boards that they can attach to, but you could also just use a breadboard.

There is one other thing I forgot to mention, the Mini, does not have a USB connector, so to upload sketches to it, you will need a USB to TTL converter. Like this HERE

HazardsMind: You have an Uno or a Mega right, do they work alone? Answer my question and you will have answered your question.

There are custom breakout boards that they can attach to, but you could also just use a breadboard.

There is one other thing I forgot to mention, the Mini, does not have a USB connector, so to upload sketches to it, you will need a USB to TTL converter. Like this HERE

I have started just now to work with this stuff, but I guess that Arduino Uno and Mega can work alone. So, yeah, Nano, Micro and Mini can work alone too, I think. And they can also work attached to a breadboard. :D