my laptop is dying

had a rather eventful morning. i woke up, turned on my computer, and once windows loaded, it prompted that it needed a restart. i did so, and once it restarted, it stated that there wasn't a valid boot device, but the recovery partition still worked (very odd). after trying many things, i finally had to select the option to reset my computer, while leaving personal files. it took quite a while for that to complete, but once done, i am left with a stripped version of Windows 10.

this is a royal pain in the butt, but i saw no other option. i still don't trust my computer now, as it is fairly old, as computers go. >:(

~Travis

travis_farmer: had a rather eventful morning. i woke up, turned on my computer, and once windows loaded, it prompted that it needed a restart. i did so, and once it restarted, it stated that there wasn't a valid boot device, but the recovery partition still worked (very odd). after trying many things, i finally had to select the option to reset my computer, while leaving personal files. it took quite a while for that to complete, but once done, i am left with a stripped version of Windows 10.

this is a royal pain in the butt, but i saw no other option. i still don't trust my computer now, as it is fairly old, as computers go. >:(

Sounds like your HDD is on its way out. Do you have SMART enabled in BIOS? I suggest you get a replacement HDD and clone your current drive onto it before you swap drives. If you've got Win 10, don't forget to also clone the hidden recovery partition, otherwise your computer won't restart.

I use Linux Mint. My main hard drive is an external USB drive so if my laptop won't boot I can plug the external drive into another laptop.

I always unmount the external drive before telling the laptop to shut down. That way if there is a problem with unmounting I can attend to it.

A few days ago there was some glitch and the touchpad would not work (my trackball and my external drive were both disconnected at the time) and I just turned the thing off by holding the power button for a few seconds. Then it refused to boot saying there were file errors that needed to be fixed by running fsck manually.

As it happens I also have PuppyLinux on the same laptop so I was able to boot that. When I had finished watching a DVD I was able to use fsck to fix the errors and reboot Mint.

If all my data had been on a laptop that could not boot it would have been very difficult to fix things.

By the way, you can run Puppy Linux from a USB stick which could give you the opportunity to fix problems with the principal OS.

...R

i don't know if SMART is enabled. should it be?

SMART does a check of your HDD on boot. It does slow the boot sequence a little. As I've never had it report an HDD failure to me, I'm not certain how it works. Google may give you more info.

BTW, the " Quote tag on the bottom of your post doesn't work?

EDIT It does now!

i don't know if SMART is enabled. should it be?

SMART does a check of your HDD on boot. It does slow the boot sequence a little. As I've never had it report an HDD failure to me, I'm not certain how it works. Google may give you more info.

BTW, the " Quote tag on the bottom of your post doesn't work????

EDIT....It does now.

Henry_Best: SMART does a check of your HDD on boot. It does slow the boot sequence a little.

I had not realized that was possible with Windows :)

...R

Actually with Windows ten that error it could be a bad update install. I had the same thing happen on one of my PCs...

travis_farmer: Hmm, interesting idea. but what happens if your external drive starts to fail?

That is why one makes backup copies of data one would not like to lose :) IIRC you participated in (or instigated?) a recent discussion on the matter of backups.

In my experience drives never "start to fail". They just stop working.

...R

I'm so sorry to hear of your loss. Our heartfelt feelings go out to you in this time of sorrow. Please accept the deepest sympathies from all of my computers.

just sayin, if you had of used the cloud the automatically back up your files in real time, you’d be good to go right now.

https://www.idrive.com

travis_farmer: just had a hard-lock freeze.

Get Puppy Linux and make a bootable USB stick. It might allow you to read files from your hard disk even if the regular boot won't work. Get the Tahrpup version rather than the newer versions - I'm not convinced they have been able to bring the newer versions to the same state of completeness, and if you are using an older PC you won't need the newer stuff.

...R

Just updated Reply #16

...R

travis_farmer: just had a hard-lock freeze. it came back, but i am stepping up my backups. saving what i can, before this "ship" goes bottom-up. still have a lot of data do go, though. :o

~Travis

Which OS are you using ?

I have recently had some odd faults with win 7 which disappear when i use my win 10 boot drive.

Identical hardware but playing around with keyboard drivers temporarily fixed the problem.

Qdeathstar: Actually with Windows ten that error it could be a bad update install. I had the same thing happen on one of my PCs...

I have had some problems with win 7 where i suspect the same sort of thing. Rolling back a month or so sometimes helped.

As an infrequent win 10 user can someone say what a hard lock is please without recourse to the internet. Google is not working at the moment.

BTW the reason i do not use win 10 is because it will not play BLU RAY or DVD.

(I do not have a telly.)

EDIT

ISTR that updates from win 8.1 and win 7 had some difference which i cannot remember

travis_farmer: a hard lock is when the computer stops responding to any and all GUI input, as well as peripheral input.

What used to be known by the acronym BSOD :)

...R

I’d rather have a hard lock than a bsod...

Robin2: What used to be known by the acronym BSOD :)

...R

Blue Screen Of Death :)

Windows version beginning with N i think.

@travis, sounds way sexier. Also, I can just chuck the computer at that point and get a new one... yays all around.

Qdeathstar: I’d rather have a hard lock than a bsod...

Back in the day some of the down-n-outs in Dublin used to "help" people to park their cars at night (when people used to drive to the pub) in the expectation of a small gratuity. They were known as "lock hards" because that was the universal advice given to the hapless motorist trying to squeeze his/her car into a tight spot.

...R

Robin2: Back in the day some of the down-n-outs in Dublin used to "help" people to park their cars at night (when people used to drive to the pub) in the expectation of a small gratuity.

...R

I have met similar when working in the past in certain areas.

If the 'gratuity' was insufficient , when you came back you would need a new set of tyres. This was an affluent area of London BTW.