Nano Arduino with M0?

I have been looking for something like the Arduino Nano (or micro) in size but using the M0. Closest I have found is the Adafruit Itsy Bitsy M0 (sorry AF but some of your naming is awful ;)). I haven't seen anything official that is that small. Maybe I am using the wrong search terms, most M0 boards seem to be based in the Uno form factor. Does anyone know if there are any other boards that exist with the uP and (approx) size?

smartroad:
sorry AF but some of your naming is awful

That one isn't bad but it really annoys me when people call WS2812 "Neopixels". It's bad enough Adafruit thought it was reasonable to rebrand stock parts they're reselling unmodified, but it's absolutely terrible when such a stupid marketing technique actually works on otherwise intelligent people.

smartroad:
most M0 boards seem to be based in the Uno form factor.

All the new official Arduino boards use the MKR form factor, not the Uno form factor.

M0 is a board in SAMD platform. Zero and MKR boards are in the same hardware package and use the same MCU.
Robotdyn has a Mini M0

pert:
That one isn't bad but it really annoys me when people call WS2812 "Neopixels". It's bad enough Adafruit thought it was reasonable to rebrand stock parts they're reselling unmodified, but it's absolutely terrible when such a stupid marketing technique actually works on otherwise intelligent people.

It confused me no end until I realised that they are the same product lol. I have to admit though, 'Neopixel' does roll off the tongue a little easier.

pert:
All the new official Arduino boards use the MKR form factor, not the Uno form factor.

I saw all of those, but none have a 'barebones' approach, unless I have missed something which its totally possible! They all have some defining feature, WiFi, GSM etc. Even the Adafruit one has its 2MB flash on board. None of which I need, and they add cost (well maybe not AF's offering).

Juraj:
M0 is a board in SAMD platform. Zero and MKR boards are in the same hardware package and use the same MCU.
Robotdyn has a Mini M0

Thanks for the link, exactly what I am looking for :slight_smile:

smartroad:
I saw all of those, but none have a 'barebones' approach, unless I have missed something which its totally possible! They all have some defining feature, WiFi, GSM etc. Even the Adafruit one has its 2MB flash on board. None of which I need, and they add cost (well maybe not AF's offering).

I've also noticed that. I think it's a real problem that board makers always tend to add on extra features. That's great if you just so happen to need that exact configuration for your project but if you don't need it then it's just annoying. I want the option of a simple breakout for the microcontroller with the minimum support components. That will be the most flexible. I can always add on the kitchen sink separately if I need it. I think that's one of the reasons why Arduino was originally successful. When they first started selling boards a lot of the other options were eval boards from the chip manufacturers which have a lot of extra random components that are intended to demonstrate functionalities of the microcontroller but are probably useless for an actual project. The closest to a barebones MKR board is the MKR ZERO.

There's also the Adafruit Feather M4, Itsy Bitsy M4 that's a 120MHz, SAMD51, Arm Cortex M4F microcontroller with a single precision hardware floating point unit.

Note that the Itsy Bitsy M0 and M4 boards are crystalless, which is fine for most projects unless you're using some absolute timing, such as the Real Time Clock (RTC). The Uno sized Adafruit Metro M4 and the smaller Feather M4 both incorporate a crystal.

Although I haven't used them, there's also the M0 based Tau and Netrino boards from Rabid Prototypes based in the US: Arduino | Product Categories | Rabid Prototypes.

Rabid Prototypes also have their faster SAMD51 based "Tachyon" board in the pipeline.

Also the Sparkfun SparkFun SAMD21 Mini Breakout

Adafruit has the feather M0 Basic as well as the ItsyBitsy. The feather somewhat has an advantage in that it's supposed to be a new "standardish" format/pinout.
(so is the Arduio MKR Zero, which doesn't have MUCH "extra")

then there are the PJRC Teensy 3.x boards and Teensy LC...