Need help with circuit and wiring! (willing to pay) water monitoring system

I am a Computer Science student making an android app-controlled aquarium monitoring system using arduino. I am currently finished with the app which uses mock data from Firebase that I will be updating later when it is already possible to push data from the sensors.

My problem is that I have very little knowledge regarding voltage, resistors, and circuits. I have been trying out several circuits I see on the internet but almost all of them only use 1-2 sensors. I am afraid to break my equipment due to wrong voltages because I have very limited resources right now.

Basically, I need a system that continuously collects data from all 3 sensors as long as the arduino is connected to power. Here are my materials:

  • Arduino Uno
  • ESP8266 WiFi Module
  • DS18B20 Water Temperature Sensor (waterproof)
  • SEN0161 Gravity: Analog pH Sensor
  • SEN0189 Gravity: Arduino Turbidity Sensor
  • NeoPixel Stick - 8 x 5050 RGB LED

Questions:
How do I connect everything (all at once) to the Arduino Uno?
Why do the sensors have different voltages?
Will this work or do I need any additional materials?
Is a breadboard required or can I connect to the arduino board directly?

I am willing to pay for a more detailed answer!! I really need to finish this project. Thank you!! My email is [deleted] by moderator

First, putting your real email in plain text on a forum is a really really bad idea. I've asked a mod to redact it for you. You'll get blasted with spam to the point you'll need a new address. You can get answers here or use the PM system and get or give an email once you meet someone that wants to help.

I'll give you a couple of general answers to the general questions.

kateanne419:
Questions:
How do I connect everything (all at once) to the Arduino Uno?

With wires. No seriously, this is a bigger question than you realize. There are likely tutorials or instructions around for each of the sensors you've mentioned. You'll have to look at them individually and see what types of signals they expect and whether or not there are libraries available.

How have you been able to write code for them without knowing how they are to be connected to the board? That's generally something you need to know before you start coding the Arduino.

kateanne419:
Why do the sensors have different voltages?

Because they do. I don't know, the whole world never agreed on one set voltage. The voltage that's good for doing one thing isn't necessarily good for something else. Why do different cars have different sized engines? Why do different animals have differently sized eyes?

kateanne419:
Will this work or do I need any additional materials?

That really depends on what you want to do and what exactly you have. At the very least you're going to need some hookup wires and connectors and things. What you need to do is get it planned out on paper first and then worry about what pieces to buy.

kateanne419:
Is a breadboard required or can I connect to the arduino board directly?

You can do a limited amount connecting directly to the Arduino board, but in reality you probably will need more space to hook everything up. As soon as any two things need to share a pin or any additional component like a pull-down resistor for a button or something like that then you need to be able to have some space to build a circuit. Again, this is the kind of thing you have to sort of draw out on paper first in order to see what you'll need.

For your

  • SEN0161 Gravity: Analog pH Sensor
  • SEN0189 Gravity: Arduino Turbidity Sensor

do you have the bare components or a "breakout" which is very common in internet.