Need help with nema23

Hi everyone! I bought 3 nena 23 5v 2A each. I'm trying to figure out which driver do I need (I'm building a cnc milling machine). I have 3 drv8825 but the lowest voltage they work with is 8v, so I'm afraid of burning the steppers. Found out that the tb6560 can work with 5v and 3A max. I think they can work but there is something I don't understand, in the datasheet it says it can work with 5v but the input needed is 10-32v. So it will work? And what power supply do I need?

The stepper basics tutorial will answer some of your questions. See the Operating Voltage section.

The voltage rating of a stepper motor is irrelevant, but the steady state current rating must be respected.

If you need the full torque provided by the 2 A/winding maximum, you will need an industrial stepper driver.

Otherwise, you could use a consumer grade stepper driver like this one, and set the current limit to 1.8 A or less.

The higher the power supply voltage, the better (up to the maximum that is safe for the motor driver).

Preminedor:
Hi everyone! I bought 3 nena 23 5v 2A each. I'm trying to figure out which driver do I need (I'm building a cnc milling machine). I have 3 drv8825 but the lowest voltage they work with is 8v, so I'm afraid of burning the steppers. Found out that the tb6560 can work with 5v and 3A max. I think they can work but there is something I don't understand, in the datasheet it says it can work with 5v but the input needed is 10-32v. So it will work? And what power supply do I need?

You would use at least 24V for a CNC machine - steppers do not have a voltage rating, they have current,
inductance and torque/speed curves (dependent on stepper driver supply voltage). The stepper driver
provides constant-current drive to the windings, acting like a buck converter.

At high speed a stepper will generate large back-EMFs on the windings (10's of volts), and the supply voltage
has to be large enough to overcome this to be able to run the motors that fast, otherwise the driver cannot force
the correct current to the windings.

Thank you very much for your answers. The are very helpful. Now that I know this I have another question. I have an ATX and one of the outputs is 12v 16A. It's ok if I try to use it with one of the motors? Just to test if everything works fine (if it does, I will buy an appropriate power source later) I forgot to say that I'm using drv8825 drivers, the datasheet says they work with 8-35V and peaks of 2.2A and a shield for the arduino.

I have an ATX and one of the outputs is 12v 16A.

I use an old ATX PC supply to power the steppers on a small 3 axis CNC machine with DRV8825 drivers (12V).

It worked! I can't believe how happy I am. Thank you all. Now (as always) there is a new problem. The motor makes a buzz and a noise like piiiiiiii while working (also while is stopped) and it's not strong at all. I can stop it with my fingers (it's a nema 23 56mm 10N/inch I think). I read it might be due to high voltage. They are working with 12v and they where meant to work with 5v. And the low strength I believe it's because I did not properly set the max amp of the drivers.

The DRV8825 ought to handle upto about 1.5A with good heatsinking, but if you've left it set at 0.5A its not
going to give much torque...

The noise is the current feedback loop operating - the motor windings act like a crude speaker and
any audio frequency components of the current will be audible (the DRV8825 has most of its energy at
30kHz which is ultrasonic, otherwise it would be very loud).