Need some guidance on a medical device design project, Arduino noob

Hi,

I'm working on a project for a medical device and I'm considering using an Arduino-based platform. The general idea is to have multiple units (like boxes) that each have sensors and these boxes send data to some central hub. Then, the central hub somehow needs to compile and display this information on a screen. Ideally, I'd like the communication between the unit/hub/display to be wireless. I have no clue where to start with this. Xbee? Arduino uno? Mega? Any input or guidance would be GREATLY appreciated. :D

Thanks all!

mndesai: I'm working on a project for a medical device ... I have no clue where to start ...

That's a real good reason to refrain from trying to make a medical device.

Any input or guidance would be GREATLY appreciated.

Here's input: Medical devices should be designed by people skilled in the art, they should be extensively tested, and they should be listed for their purpose. They shouldn't be designed by people who "have no clue."

Here's guidance: DO NOT ATTEMPT.

Now, maybe when you say, "medical device," you're talking about a device that monitors your brain waves, determines whether you want pizza or Chinese takeout, and orders it online. If that, or something like it, is what you contemplate, say so.

Like tmd3 said, medical device is serous business. If you are doing this as a college degree project, sure, use xbee and mega 2560. Thats all you need really. If you can afford, get xbee pro with digimesh firmware and one connectport x2 from digi.

my suggestion is to get a couple units. have one measure light another water level and have them talk to the third.

learn how to measure things and get some to talk to each other.

once you are competent is the hardware, start to expand your applications.

I think most of us would consider medical devices and explosives as things best done by highly trained professionals.

Hardware is all there. It is software I worry.

In the Atmel data sheet for the processor chip there is a specific disclaimer that it is not to be used for medical devices.

I suppose it depends how you define a "medical device"......

There's a thread knocking around about using an LM35 to read human body temp, and there are threads about using the amped heart rate monitor. In a broad sense those are "medical devices" I guess, but probably not something you would ever find in your doctor's rooms or hospital.

To me the test would be, who is going to use it? If it's used by a medical professional of any description (emt-b up) then it's a "medical device" and if you have no clue then leave it alone. Other uses- like a science fair where passers-by can see their pulse rate- that's ok.

tmd3:

mndesai: I'm working on a project for a medical device ... I have no clue where to start ...

That's a real good reason to refrain from trying to make a medical device.

Any input or guidance would be GREATLY appreciated.

Here's input: Medical devices should be designed by people skilled in the art, they should be extensively tested, and they should be listed for their purpose. They shouldn't be designed by people who "have no clue."

Here's guidance: DO NOT ATTEMPT.

Now, maybe when you say, "medical device," you're talking about a device that monitors your brain waves, determines whether you want pizza or Chinese takeout, and orders it online. If that, or something like it, is what you contemplate, say so.

Senior design projects are obviously not going to be used for any actual medical purpose.......

If you literally have no clue, I recommend getting hold of an Uno. Probably easiest to get a starter kit of one type or other. Play with some sensors of both digital and analog type, get the feel of it.

There's an official Arduino starter kit, but also look sites like Sparkfun and Adafruit.

Then think of how to read your specific sensors, and then look at communications.

Somewhere amid all the "don't call it a medical device" and "Get a Clue first" responses are the answers to your question(s), Go first with a get a duino starter kit and learn to use it, then look up 'Mesh'. If you don't have time for that, because it is a senior's project, then choose another project, you haven't been listening in class (or maybe the scope of the class isn't quite up to the scale of your project)'.

The OP doesn't say it's an academic effort; we've inferred that, and we might be wrong. Maybe it's an academic, or veterinary, or even agricultural project. If it's never going to be involved in human patient care, the OP can say so, and anyone can decide whether to participate. For now, I'm presuming that the term, "medical device," means, well, a medical device. It wouldn't be the first time on this forum: http://forum.arduino.cc/index.php?topic=180658.0.

If it's intended to perform a medical-ish function, like pulse rate measurement, on healthy people able to care for themselves, I'd still seriously recommend that it be battery-powered. I'm against the notion of attaching anything to a human that relies on the isolation of a cheap wall-wart.

mndesai: Hi,

I'm working on a project for a medical device and I'm considering using an Arduino-based platform. The general idea is to have multiple units (like boxes) that each have sensors and these boxes send data to some central hub. Then, the central hub somehow needs to compile and display this information on a screen. Ideally, I'd like the communication between the unit/hub/display to be wireless. I have no clue where to start with this. Xbee? Arduino uno? Mega? Any input or guidance would be GREATLY appreciated. :D

Thanks all!

to re-cap, multiple remote devices. central hub display of all parameters from remote devices onto one display

set one remote to read temperature and humidity set a second too read temperature and humidity use the hub to poll these devices and then display on your screen.

look up arduino remote thermostat or remote weather.

since you have all the other hardware, all you need to do is find how to send the signals back.

for a class project not a problem. for any possible use for medical applications, you need multiple levels of redundancy. even your back-up system should have a back-up system. you should get a licensed professional to take your idea and make it into a device.

Thanks for everyone's input. Just to make it clear, this is not for actual medical use, it is indeed just a class project, proof of concept type deal.

mndesai: Thanks for everyone's input. Just to make it clear, this is not for actual medical use, it is indeed just a class project, proof of concept type deal.

Great! Atmel will be so relieved. Now I can openly make suggestions:

Expensive version: $700USD 1) 3 xbee pro 900 HP radio modules 2) 2 Arduino official wireless shield (xbee+sd card for local data cache in case xbee network is down) 3) 1 sparkfun xbee explorer (flash firmware on xbee, don't use any other xbee shield for this) 4) 1 digi connectPortX4 routing gateway, ethernet xbee version. 5) 1 free etherious developer account to manage the radios and devices.

Less expensive version: $300USD 1) 3 xbee pro 2.4G radio modules 2) 2 Arduino official wireless shield (xbee+sd card for local data cache in case xbee network is down) 3) 1 sparkfun xbee explorer (flash firmware on xbee, don't use any other xbee shield for this) 4) 1 digi connectPortX2 routing gateway, ethernet xbee version. 5) 1 free etherious developer account to manage the radios and devices.

I recommend the less expensive version since you are a student. For arduinos, get one official board (Uno or Leonardo) to thank the Arduino team, and then but more unofficial ones on ebay.