NEMA 17 axial shaft load ?

I am not an expert in robotic.
I am currently working a new prototype display window. The concept is to give a 360° vue of the displayed object. We plan on hanging the object to 2 threads that would be somehow attached to the motor in the upper part of the display.
What is the maximal load that I can hang from my motor shaft ( in the axial direction) without slowly damaging my motor? (I didn't find this info in the datasheets)
thx

The stepper will probably stall before it damages itself too much.

What sort of weight are we talking about anyway as that will help define a few things.
Need more info really and if it is too much weight you could also employ a bottom motor too maybe.

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rgoffard:
What is the maximal load that I can hang from my motor shaft ( in the axial direction) without slowly damaging my motor? (I didn't find this info in the datasheets)

If it's not in the datasheet you will need to contact the manufacturer. I doubt if there is any general answer as everything depends on the type and quality of the bearings in the motor.

As @ballscrewbob has said, please tell us the weight you are planning to hang off the motor.

Maybe the practical answer is "suck it and see" :slight_smile: The worst that can happen is that you need to replace the motor.

...R

Thx for your input,
Sure I could kust test it, but I need to know how this will behave in time. That display is gonna be installed far away from me and I want to avoid maintenance overthere.

For this first occurence I m going to hang around 500g on the shaft... But I d love to design something more versatile and be able to hang object as heavy as 1Kg in the future without replanning a design with a gear system.

If you think the motor can't handle this (500 to 1000g), I'll directly make a design with a gear to avoid loading the motor. But If its not needed...

rgoffard:
If you think the motor can't handle this (500 to 1000g),

How could we know whether it can or cannot? (even if you had given details of your specific motor).

If a maintenance free project is important then use a separate thrust bearing to take the load.

...R

Why use a stepper ?

There are many motors more suitable and probably cheaper that can simply be controlled via a MOSFET which would also reduce cost.

Stepper motor seems a little overkill but 500g is not a great deal so I would be tempted to say yes it would work (unqualified)

The motor I am planning to use is an OMC 17HS19-2004S1 .

I wanted to use a stepper motor so I can control it easily: make one turn , wait a miunte, make another turn, or anything else.

Also I ll admit I don't know of other kind of suitable motors for this application.

rgoffard:
The motor I am planning to use is an OMC 17HS19-2004S1 .

You need to post a link to a motor's datasheet, not just its code number. But you have already said that the data you are interested in is not in the datasheet so posting a link would not help in this case.

Have you tried contacting the manufacturer as I suggested earlier?

...R

The problem with using a stepper motor for your project is it has to be powered at all times and will get warm or hot, depending on the current setting you use. That, and being on end may allow bearing lubricant to leak out onto the shaft.

You state you do not know how you are going to attach the thing to the motor shaft, but have not stated how you also intend to mount the actual motor, controlling electronics and power supply. Are they going to be in an enclosure with the motor?

Paul

rgoffard:
I am not an expert in robotic.
I am currently working a new prototype display window. The concept is to give a 360° vue of the displayed object. We plan on hanging the object to 2 threads that would be somehow attached to the motor in the upper part of the display.
What is the maximal load that I can hang from my motor shaft ( in the axial direction) without slowly damaging my motor? (I didn't find this info in the datasheets)
thx

Then the datasheet is hopeless - axial and radial loadings are fundamental motor specifications
needed to actually use one in some mechanism!!

If you can read the part number on the end bearings of the motor I'd just look up that bearing type
and find some sort of rating for the bearing, since this is the limiting factor usually.

A common bearing for a 5mm shaft is likely to be something like 5x16x5 such as 625ZZ.